From team-building exercises with horses to an engaging drug and alcohol panel discussion with local court officials to a children’s activities fair with the community, it was another busy and productive summer for Bloomsburg University’s TRiO Upward Bound Program. It was also a summer of celebration, marking the 50th anniversary of the federal grant program and its 37th year on campus. Since 1965, Upward Bound has grown from 17 initial programs with 2,061 participants to today featuring 964 funded programs working with more than 80,000 students.

Upward Bound is a national program funded through the Department of Education that more than doubles the chances of first-generation students graduating college. Locally, the BU program serves students from Berwick, Mahony, Milton, Mount Carmel, North Schuylkill, Pottsville, Shamokin and Shikellamy high schools. 

The program – with the help of a mentoring and support staff of Bloomsburg University students – provides a wide range of services to prepare its participants to succeed in college. They include weekly tutoring, test preparation, college application and financial aid form assistance, cultural enrichment programs, field trips and a summer academic program.

Among the highlights of the 2014 Summer STEM Academy were:

  • a drug and alcohol panel featuring Columbia County Judge Thomas James and other county court officials
  • team-building exercises at Willow Creek Farms in Numidia
  • a STEM Activities Fair at McBride Memorial Library in Berwick
  • a Family Movie fundraiser with the Berwick Theater
  • an interactive workshop with The Actor’s Company Theatre
  • several site visits and campus tours of universities across the region.

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Representatives of PPL Corporation and affiliates were on campus recently to present a check for $20,000 to provide continuing support for the STEM Magnet program. The company has played an integral part in the formation of the collaborative effort between Bloomsburg University, eight school districts and regional businesses and foundations to serve local high school students in advancing in the science, math, engineering and mathematics disciplines.
PPL leaders provide input on the development of the curriculum and serve as mentors to students in the program in addition to the financial commitment. Pictured (L-R) Michael Munroe, plant manager, PPL Montour; Elizabeth Mauch, dean of the College of Education; Teri MacBride, PPL regional affairs director, Susquehanna Valley; and David L. Soltz, BU president.
From courses in human biology to object-oriented Java programming to calculus, College of Science and Technology’s first-ever Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Magnet program capped its initial year without a hitch. Roughly 40 students from Berwick, Bloomsburg and Central Columbia school districts got a taste of higher education while earning college credits by completing STEM courses on campus this past fall and spring semesters. The program will grow next year, adding students from Benton, Danville, Millville and Southern Columbia school districts, along with Columbia-Montour Area Vocational Technical School.

Representatives of PPL Corporation and affiliates were on campus recently to present a check for $20,000 to provide continuing support for the STEM Magnet program. The company has played an integral part in the formation of the collaborative effort between Bloomsburg University, eight school districts and regional businesses and foundations to serve local high school students in advancing in the science, math, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

PPL leaders provide input on the development of the curriculum and serve as mentors to students in the program in addition to the financial commitment. Pictured (L-R) Michael Munroe, plant manager, PPL Montour; Elizabeth Mauch, dean of the College of Education; Teri MacBride, PPL regional affairs director, Susquehanna Valley; and David L. Soltz, BU president.

From courses in human biology to object-oriented Java programming to calculus, College of Science and Technology’s first-ever Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Magnet program capped its initial year without a hitch. Roughly 40 students from Berwick, Bloomsburg and Central Columbia school districts got a taste of higher education while earning college credits by completing STEM courses on campus this past fall and spring semesters. The program will grow next year, adding students from Benton, Danville, Millville and Southern Columbia school districts, along with Columbia-Montour Area Vocational Technical School.

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Bloomsburg University’s new Sustainable Food Systems Outdoor Classroom recently got its first group of visitors when several Quest adventure campers stopped for a picnic, where the youngsters enjoyed freshly cut kohlrabi sticks and freshly squeezed kale orange juice.

The outdoor classroom, one of five projects awarded a Presidential Strategic Planning Grant last year, will be a working garden and sustainability education center run primarily by student workers and interns. Located behind Monty’s on upper campus, the outdoor classroom was designed in collaboration with students who also helped build the gardens this past spring.

Currently, there are two students helping John Hintz and Sandra Kehoe-Forutan, professors of environmental, geographical and geological sciences, care for the gardens over the summer. There are 30 raised beds filled with vegetables and herbs. There will be a third student starting work in July on the perennial garden.

The completed outdoor classroom will feature walking paths between well-tended raised garden beds, interactive interpretive signage, a solar greenhouse, a composting site, a rain garden, perennial plants and birdhouses around the periphery, and a seating area and educational kiosk.

Coursework, educational workshops, internships, professional development opportunities, and volunteer opportunities at the outdoor classroom will provide high impact practices new to our university. The outdoor classroom will provide a state-of-the-art showpiece of sustainable food production that helps prepare students to be confident, knowledgeable, engaged, and productive citizens.

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From exploring digital forensics to deciphering secret computer codes to testing chemical reactions to examining the difference between human and animal bones, Bloomsburg University’s Math and Science Summer Experience recently opened several impressionable eyes on campus.

More than 50 local middle and high school students participated in the week-long camp, where they got a taste of digital forensics, computer science, human and biological forensics.

The annual camp - hosted by the College of Science and Technology - is designed to broaden the participants’ interest in math and science, along with enhancing their skills and understanding to bridge the summer break gap. Their classroom exploration included hands-on labs and exercises, presentations and demonstrations. 

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When you get called out on the basketball court, you must step up. It’s part of the competitive spirit of the game. And this unwritten rule of the court has apparently made its way into this offseason … for a good cause.

Bill Cleary, head women’s basketball coach at Bloomsburg University, accepted the #Chillin4Charity challenge Wednesday, June 25, from Kyle Adams, head women’s basketball coach at Cheyney University – and in the process – called out three other Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference women’s basketball coaches.

Surrounded by an enthusiastic crowd of youth baseball campers at Danny Hale Field at Redman Stadium, Cleary fulfilled his challenge by being doused with two buckets of ice water, assisted by two of his players, Jocelyn Ford and Brianna Dudeck.

Cheyney and Bloomsburg are just two of the latest women’s basketball programs to participate in the #Chillin4Charity cold water challenge, which has included Notre Dame, UConn and Oklahoma. Initiated by Niya Butts, head women’s basketball coach at Arizona University, the challenge pits coaches and players with the decision to be dunked with water or donate to escape the ice water shower.

Proceeds benefit the Kay Yow Fund, an organization created in honor of legendary NC State women’s basketball coach Kay Yow, who died of breast cancer in 2009.

#Chillin4Charity Rules: If you accept and complete the challenge within 48 hours, your challenger will donate $50 to the Kay Yow Fund. If you fail to accept the challenge, you owe the Kay Yow Fund $250. Student-athletes participating are donating community service hours.

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