Bloomsburg University is hosting the 2014 Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) Woman’s Consortium Conference on Sept. 25 to 26. Filled with a wellness room, multiple workshops and Sarah Kay as the keynote speaker; conference fees start at $90 for non-members, $75 for members and students are free.

The Woman’s Consortium is designed to have woman in the State System collaborate and develop leadership skills. Students, faculty and staff are all invited to participate in these conferences.

The Consortium has three institutes they base their conferences off of: Woman’s Student Leadership, Woman’s Faculty Leadership, and Woman’s Staff Leadership. All of these programs strive to better their knowledge and to learn more about each other’s experiences to help support one another. 

The keynote speaker Sarah Kay started poetry when she was 14. She took the stage and competed against more experience poets. She founded Project VOICE, an organizations that uses poetry as an empowerment tool.

This consortium gives the opportunity for woman through out the State System to connect with more than just their campus. It proceeds to provide woman with a mentorship and a network to collaborate with projects.

Denise Chaytor – Zugarek, retention specialist and apart of the Trio Student Support Service, says the motto for the conference is “One Strong Voice.” Providing information, to woman of all nature, which they can use in every day life. They will feel empowered to create positive change in their school or community.

For more information contact Chaytor-Zagarek at dchaytor@bloomu.edu.

— Samantha Gross, sophomore telecommunications major

CollaborativeLearning SenseOfCommunity

Following another successful Meet the President event recently on campus, President David L. Soltz had the pleasure of joining the millions of people who have taken the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. The creative fundraiser, made famous on social media by the many ice-dousing videos, has been tremendously successful in raising more than $110.5 million for the ALS Association.

As Soltz said during his challenge, ALS, commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is a relentless degenerative disease that leads slowly to death. To date, there is no cure. Hopefully this will change due to the overwhelming support seen these past few months by our society, including many of Bloomsburg University’s family and friends.

Rising to the challenge to support a worthy cause is nothing new to the university community. It’s almost second nature for our students, faculty and staff.

For example one of BU’s sororities, Sigma Sigma Sigma, recently helped Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital land a $2,210 grant for needed teaching aides for its patients.

Their charitable effort is one of many examples of how BU’s Greek organizations – as well as other student groups – work with our community and support local and national charities like the Ronald McDonald House, Toys for Tots, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and our local women’s shelter and food cupboard.

Of course a prime example of BU’s passion for charity and community support is The Big Event, which annually receives a steady flow of volunteers from our entire student population. In fact, two of the largest on-campus fundraising efforts turned in record level donations this past academic year.

Relay For Life of Bloomsburg University, coordinated by the campus Chapter of Colleges Against Cancer, had more than 800 participants on 50 teamsraise more than $50,000 to benefit the American Cancer Society.

The Multicultural Center’s annual Breast Cancer 5K Walk/Run has raised more than $100,000 since the first step was taken in 2002, including more than $12,000 last fall.

These recent highlights remind BU of the biggest challenge it’s faced and the strongest relief effort it’s pulled together in recent memory. Three years ago this past week, the Flood of 2011 forever changed the landscape and, in many case, the future of the Bloomsburg community. The clear view of the Bloomsburg Fairgrounds from Route 11, where a row of houses once stood, is one permanent reminder. There are a thousand other examples in our immediate region.

BU lost seven days of classes, yet the university continued to work. Students, faculty and staff volunteered with clean up, Red Cross efforts and local emergency governmental agencies, such as call-in centers and supply aide distribution. These volunteer efforts continued well into the fall and spring. It was a clear and emotional snapshot at how much BU values its community and, in many ways, brought the community and school closer together. 

IceBucketChallenge SenseOfCommunity HuskyUnleashed HuskyPride

Don’t miss the weekly Bloomsburg University Farmers Market between Navy Hall and Bakeless Center on Fridays, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Plus … get your free reusable dining containers, courtesy of BU’s Green Campus Initiative. Pick one up! When you use it on campus, you get a free cookie (while supplies last).
At the Farmers Market
Dancing Hen Farm — In addition to the leafy greens, potatoes, additional vegetables and eggs featured last week, Dancing Hen will also offer free-range chicken on Friday.
Rohrbach’s Farm Market — The fruit that Rohrbach’s is famous for will be back and some late summer sweet corn is likely to be available tomorrow.
Endless Mountains Farmstead — Cucumbers, Potatoes, Beets, Swiss Chard, Basil and Carrots will be among Endless Mountains’ offerings.
Bloomburg University Outdoor Classroom — The Classroom continues to produce perfect vegetables organically and this week heirloom tomatoes, Kale, and four varieties of sweet peppers.

Don’t miss the weekly Bloomsburg University Farmers Market between Navy Hall and Bakeless Center on Fridays, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Plus … get your free reusable dining containers, courtesy of BU’s Green Campus Initiative. Pick one up! When you use it on campus, you get a free cookie (while supplies last).

At the Farmers Market

  • Dancing Hen Farm — In addition to the leafy greens, potatoes, additional vegetables and eggs featured last week, Dancing Hen will also offer free-range chicken on Friday.
  • Rohrbach’s Farm Market — The fruit that Rohrbach’s is famous for will be back and some late summer sweet corn is likely to be available tomorrow.
  • Endless Mountains Farmstead — Cucumbers, Potatoes, Beets, Swiss Chard, Basil and Carrots will be among Endless Mountains’ offerings.
  • Bloomburg University Outdoor Classroom — The Classroom continues to produce perfect vegetables organically and this week heirloom tomatoes, Kale, and four varieties of sweet peppers.

BUSustainability SenseOfCommunity

Patients at Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital will face an easier transition into certain treatment thanks to Bloomsburg University’s Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, who recently helped the local hospital land a $2,210 grant for needed teaching aides.

The children’s hospital will use the grant to purchase MediKin dolls, overlays and toy models of equipment — items that help prepare patients and their families for medical treatment, such as dialysis and oncology. Funding will be provided through a local Robbie Page Memorial (RPM) Grant via the Sigma Sigma Foundation

As a national organization, Sigma Sigma Sigma’s motto is “Sigma Serves Children.” In 1951, the sorority established the RPM Fund for Polio research projects. When a cure for Polio was discovered, the purpose of the RPM shifted focus to play therapy. The foundation helps hundreds of children annually through the RPM Fund, which supports local and national RPM grants.

Bloomsburg’s local Delta Zeta Chapter has spent much of the past year working with Geisigner’s Child Life Services in support of several collection drives, hosting guest speakers at the sorority and planning fall activities with the child patients and families in Danville.

SenseOfCommunity HuskyUnleashed BUGreekLife

From team-building exercises with horses to an engaging drug and alcohol panel discussion with local court officials to a children’s activities fair with the community, it was another busy and productive summer for Bloomsburg University’s TRiO Upward Bound Program. It was also a summer of celebration, marking the 50th anniversary of the federal grant program and its 37th year on campus. Since 1965, Upward Bound has grown from 17 initial programs with 2,061 participants to today featuring 964 funded programs working with more than 80,000 students.

Upward Bound is a national program funded through the Department of Education that more than doubles the chances of first-generation students graduating college. Locally, the BU program serves students from Berwick, Mahony, Milton, Mount Carmel, North Schuylkill, Pottsville, Shamokin and Shikellamy high schools. 

The program – with the help of a mentoring and support staff of Bloomsburg University students – provides a wide range of services to prepare its participants to succeed in college. They include weekly tutoring, test preparation, college application and financial aid form assistance, cultural enrichment programs, field trips and a summer academic program.

Among the highlights of the 2014 Summer STEM Academy were:

  • a drug and alcohol panel featuring Columbia County Judge Thomas James and other county court officials
  • team-building exercises at Willow Creek Farms in Numidia
  • a STEM Activities Fair at McBride Memorial Library in Berwick
  • a Family Movie fundraiser with the Berwick Theater
  • an interactive workshop with The Actor’s Company Theatre
  • several site visits and campus tours of universities across the region.

SenseOfCommunity CoCurricularLearning CollaborativeLearning FutureHusky TRiO

Representatives of PPL Corporation and affiliates were on campus recently to present a check for $20,000 to provide continuing support for the STEM Magnet program. The company has played an integral part in the formation of the collaborative effort between Bloomsburg University, eight school districts and regional businesses and foundations to serve local high school students in advancing in the science, math, engineering and mathematics disciplines.
PPL leaders provide input on the development of the curriculum and serve as mentors to students in the program in addition to the financial commitment. Pictured (L-R) Michael Munroe, plant manager, PPL Montour; Elizabeth Mauch, dean of the College of Education; Teri MacBride, PPL regional affairs director, Susquehanna Valley; and David L. Soltz, BU president.
From courses in human biology to object-oriented Java programming to calculus, BU’s first-ever Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Magnet program capped its initial year without a hitch. Roughly 40 students from Berwick, Bloomsburg and Central Columbia school districts got a taste of higher education while earning college credits by completing STEM courses on campus this past fall and spring semesters. The program will grow next year, adding students from Benton, Danville, Millville and Southern Columbia school districts, along with Columbia-Montour Area Vocational Technical School.

Representatives of PPL Corporation and affiliates were on campus recently to present a check for $20,000 to provide continuing support for the STEM Magnet program. The company has played an integral part in the formation of the collaborative effort between Bloomsburg University, eight school districts and regional businesses and foundations to serve local high school students in advancing in the science, math, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

PPL leaders provide input on the development of the curriculum and serve as mentors to students in the program in addition to the financial commitment. Pictured (L-R) Michael Munroe, plant manager, PPL Montour; Elizabeth Mauch, dean of the College of Education; Teri MacBride, PPL regional affairs director, Susquehanna Valley; and David L. Soltz, BU president.

From courses in human biology to object-oriented Java programming to calculus, BU’s first-ever Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Magnet program capped its initial year without a hitch. Roughly 40 students from Berwick, Bloomsburg and Central Columbia school districts got a taste of higher education while earning college credits by completing STEM courses on campus this past fall and spring semesters. The program will grow next year, adding students from Benton, Danville, Millville and Southern Columbia school districts, along with Columbia-Montour Area Vocational Technical School.

SenseOfCommunity STEM

Bloomsburg University’s new Sustainable Food Systems Outdoor Classroom recently got its first group of visitors when several Quest adventure campers stopped for a picnic, where the youngsters enjoyed freshly cut kohlrabi sticks and freshly squeezed kale orange juice.

The outdoor classroom, one of five projects awarded a Presidential Strategic Planning Grant last year, will be a working garden and sustainability education center run primarily by student workers and interns. Located behind Monty’s on upper campus, the outdoor classroom was designed in collaboration with students who also helped build the gardens this past spring.

Currently, there are two students helping John Hintz and Sandra Kehoe-Forutan, professors of environmental, geographical and geological sciences, care for the gardens over the summer. There are 30 raised beds filled with vegetables and herbs. There will be a third student starting work in July on the perennial garden.

The completed outdoor classroom will feature walking paths between well-tended raised garden beds, interactive interpretive signage, a solar greenhouse, a composting site, a rain garden, perennial plants and birdhouses around the periphery, and a seating area and educational kiosk.

Coursework, educational workshops, internships, professional development opportunities, and volunteer opportunities at the outdoor classroom will provide high impact practices new to our university. The outdoor classroom will provide a state-of-the-art showpiece of sustainable food production that helps prepare students to be confident, knowledgeable, engaged, and productive citizens.

BUSustainability CoCurricularLearning EGGS SenseOfCommunity CollaborativeLearning

From exploring digital forensics to deciphering secret computer codes to testing chemical reactions to examining the difference between human and animal bones, Bloomsburg University’s Math and Science Summer Experience recently opened several impressionable eyes on campus.

More than 50 local middle and high school students participated in the week-long camp, where they got a taste of digital forensics, computer science, human and biological forensics.

The annual camp - hosted by the College of Science and Technology - is designed to broaden the participants’ interest in math and science, along with enhancing their skills and understanding to bridge the summer break gap. Their classroom exploration included hands-on labs and exercises, presentations and demonstrations. 

CollaborativeLearning FutureHusky SenseOfCommunity DigitalForensics ComputerScience ScienceTechnology