Following another successful Meet the President event recently on campus, President David L. Soltz had the pleasure of joining the millions of people who have taken the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. The creative fundraiser, made famous on social media by the many ice-dousing videos, has been tremendously successful in raising more than $110.5 million for the ALS Association.

As Soltz said during his challenge, ALS, commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is a relentless degenerative disease that leads slowly to death. To date, there is no cure. Hopefully this will change due to the overwhelming support seen these past few months by our society, including many of Bloomsburg University’s family and friends.

Rising to the challenge to support a worthy cause is nothing new to the university community. It’s almost second nature for our students, faculty and staff.

For example one of BU’s sororities, Sigma Sigma Sigma, recently helped Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital land a $2,210 grant for needed teaching aides for its patients.

Their charitable effort is one of many examples of how BU’s Greek organizations – as well as other student groups – work with our community and support local and national charities like the Ronald McDonald House, Toys for Tots, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and our local women’s shelter and food cupboard.

Of course a prime example of BU’s passion for charity and community support is The Big Event, which annually receives a steady flow of volunteers from our entire student population. In fact, two of the largest on-campus fundraising efforts turned in record level donations this past academic year.

Relay For Life of Bloomsburg University, coordinated by the campus Chapter of Colleges Against Cancer, had more than 800 participants on 50 teamsraise more than $50,000 to benefit the American Cancer Society.

The Multicultural Center’s annual Breast Cancer 5K Walk/Run has raised more than $100,000 since the first step was taken in 2002, including more than $12,000 last fall.

These recent highlights remind BU of the biggest challenge it’s faced and the strongest relief effort it’s pulled together in recent memory. Three years ago this past week, the Flood of 2011 forever changed the landscape and, in many case, the future of the Bloomsburg community. The clear view of the Bloomsburg Fairgrounds from Route 11, where a row of houses once stood, is one permanent reminder. There are a thousand other examples in our immediate region.

BU lost seven days of classes, yet the university continued to work. Students, faculty and staff volunteered with clean up, Red Cross efforts and local emergency governmental agencies, such as call-in centers and supply aide distribution. These volunteer efforts continued well into the fall and spring. It was a clear and emotional snapshot at how much BU values its community and, in many ways, brought the community and school closer together. 

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From billiards in the dark to a guest lecture on media and politics to a taste of the world event with live Latin jazz music highlight this week’s activities and entertainment across campus.  In addition, several bus trips are open for student sign up to include a spooky Boston trip over the Halloween weekend.

And not to forget, exclusive BU student pre-sale for the Icona Pop concert with special guests Five Knives and Lowell will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 1, and Thursday, Oct. 2. The fall concert will be held Thursday, Oct. 30, at 8 p.m. in Nelson Field House.

This Week Unleashed …

  • Diversity has lost its meaning and Justin Jones Fosu has figured out how to talk about some of the basics of diversity but not excluding how complex it actually is. He discovered it’s all about learning to hug an elephant and kiss a giraffe. Monday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m. in Kehr Union Ballroom Fosu presents, “Hug an Elephant, Kiss a Giraffe: Redefining Diversity in Everyday Life.” By using music, movement and a substance-packed presentation, it brings the experience to life.
  • Discounted Fair Tickets! — Purchase discounted fair admission tickets for only $5 in the Student Activities Office, KUB 350. Discount tickets for students only.
  • Haunted Husky Hollow — There will be a meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 24, at 9:15 p.m. in Centennial 218 for all students interested in helping volunteer to be a part of the 5th annual Haunted Woods Walk. Haunted Husky Hollow will run on Oct. 23 to 24 at the Quest Team-building Woods Trail and is open to the general public for free admission.
  • Celebrate Bisexuality Day Workshop — Tuesday, Sept. 23, at 7 p.m. in the KUB Multipurpose B.
  • Flavors of the World — will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 23, in the Multicultural Center, from 6 to 8 p.m., along with a special performance by Karen Rodriguez, Latin jazz artist.
  • X-Men Days of Future Past — will be shown in the KUB Hideaway on Wednesday, Sept. 24, on Friday, Sept. 26 and on Sunday, Sept. 28 at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Free Admission w/ BU student ID and paid fall ’14 Community Activity Fee. All others $1.
  • From the son of a Philadelphia police officer to a career in military education to now a U.S. Congressman, Patrick J. Murphy will be coming to Bloomsburg to discuss media and politics in the 21st century. Sponsored by the mass communications department, the host of MSNBC’s “Taking the Hill” will be at McCormick Center 1303 on Thursday, Sept. 25 at 7 p.m.
  • Farmers Market — local vegetables, fruits and more are featured each Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Farmers Market adjacent to Navy Hall and Bakeless Center.
  • Icona Pop — with special guests Five Knives and Lowell Thursday, Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. in the Nelson Field House. Buy your tickets on Oct. 1 and be entered in a drawing for a meet and greet with Icona Pop. Tickets available for sale at the Student Activities Office, 350 Kehr Union Building.

Husky Road Trips!

  • Football Fan Bus — sign up in the Community Activities Office or at the Concession stand at the California and Shippensburg Home Football Games! You must sign up before noon on the Thursday before the game. Buses are available for the Cheyney, Kutztown and Lock Haven games.
  • Baltimore Bus Trip — sign up in the Student Activities Office (KUB 350). Bus departs the Hospital Lot on Saturday, Oct. 4, at 7 a.m. and leaves Baltimore at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 with BU student ID and paid Fall ’14 C.A. fee; $35 with ID only and for guests.
  • Halloween in Salem/Boston — sign up in the Student Activities Office (KUB 350). Join us for this overnight bus trip from Friday, Oct. 31, to Saturday, Nov. 1. Salem, “The Witch City,” will have plenty of Halloween events. Cost, as low as $110, includes two-way coach bus transportation, one night of lodging near Boston and an optional trip into Salem. You’re responsible for securing your own roommates.

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Patients at Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital will face an easier transition into certain treatment thanks to Bloomsburg University’s Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, who recently helped the local hospital land a $2,210 grant for needed teaching aides.

The children’s hospital will use the grant to purchase MediKin dolls, overlays and toy models of equipment — items that help prepare patients and their families for medical treatment, such as dialysis and oncology. Funding will be provided through a local Robbie Page Memorial (RPM) Grant via the Sigma Sigma Foundation

As a national organization, Sigma Sigma Sigma’s motto is “Sigma Serves Children.” In 1951, the sorority established the RPM Fund for Polio research projects. When a cure for Polio was discovered, the purpose of the RPM shifted focus to play therapy. The foundation helps hundreds of children annually through the RPM Fund, which supports local and national RPM grants.

Bloomsburg’s local Delta Zeta Chapter has spent much of the past year working with Geisigner’s Child Life Services in support of several collection drives, hosting guest speakers at the sorority and planning fall activities with the child patients and families in Danville.

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There are countless ways to enjoy summer in addition to beach vacations, music concerts and even part-time jobs. In fact, many Huskies took advantage of the gap between May graduation and August move-in to continue their Bloomsburg University experience in a variety of fashions. 

Among the wide range of co-curricular learning opportunities included working internships, conducting research and studying abroad.

Some of standout experiences included students placing among the top in the world in the Odyssey of the Mind competition in Iowa, students making record discoveries at a Hopewell archaeological dig in Ohio and several students showcasing their research - two who won awards - among more than 80 participants at the Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium at Geisinger’s Henry Hood Center for Health Research.

Among the highlights:

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Summer break has began a little differently for a group of anthropology students who put their vacation plans on hold for a memorable field school experience in Ohio. Among the highlights so far, they say, were learning the processes of an archaeological dig, discovering Hopewell artifacts and campfire conversations — along with a growing appreciation of wind and shade.

DeeAnne Wymer, professor of anthropology, and a group of students hit the road each spring in mid-May to spend four weeks in southern Ohio digging at a Hopewell habitation site. The archeological field school experience enables student teams to rely on new imaging technologies to uncover another living site of the Mound Builders from 2,000 years ago.

Life in the Dig

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Chris Vanek, a senior electronics engineering technology major, worked on sponsored research by the United States Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., on wireless power transfer (WPT) technology.  He designed and implemented a 4-MHz inductive-resonance WPT system that transferred 75 W of power wirelessly to a light bulb.
The WPT system, designed under the guidance of Biswajit Ray, professor of EET, worked up to a separation distance of 50 cm between the transmit and receive coils. The wireless power transfer technology is becoming increasingly popular for consumer electronics, electric vehicle charging, and implantable biomedical devices. 
The current engineering challenge is to design systems that maintain high power and high efficiency capability for dynamic loads with changing distance and orientation.

Chris Vanek, a senior electronics engineering technology major, worked on sponsored research by the United States Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., on wireless power transfer (WPT) technology.  He designed and implemented a 4-MHz inductive-resonance WPT system that transferred 75 W of power wirelessly to a light bulb.

The WPT system, designed under the guidance of Biswajit Ray, professor of EET, worked up to a separation distance of 50 cm between the transmit and receive coils. The wireless power transfer technology is becoming increasingly popular for consumer electronics, electric vehicle charging, and implantable biomedical devices. 

The current engineering challenge is to design systems that maintain high power and high efficiency capability for dynamic loads with changing distance and orientation.

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