For Irina Shigarova, this fall semester at Bloomsburg University is unlike any that she has ever experienced. Originally from Eastern Siberia, Shigarova was selected as BU’s first Fulbright Language Teaching Assistant with the help of Russian language professor, Mykola Polyuha, who originally came to the United States as a Fulbright scholar to complete his master’s degree at Penn State University.
Shigarova, who previously worked in the Russian city of Irkutsk with a population of approximately 600,000 people, says Bloomsburg provides a much calmer atmosphere than her previous work place. Along with the overall differences in community life, she describes the challenges that she faces on a daily basis, specifically the lack of public transportation and a much different variety of food.
She is also adjusting to a different language – a different style of the English language. Shigarova taught English at Irkutsk Language Centre Bigben, and is therefore more familiar with British English, which she states, is surprisingly different from American English.
These challenges have not stopped Shigarova. Along with teaching a Russian literature course this fall and a culture course in the spring, she is involved in the Russian Culture Club, provides native experience to students through games and books, and serves as a cultural ambassador. She also is furthering her personal interests by taking a dance class.  
When asked what she hopes to bring to BU, Shigarova describes her past experiences with U.S. citizens who expressed the belief that Russians are intimidating or downright “scary.” Her main goal is to eliminate this idea, starting at BU. “The politics do not talk about real people,” Shigarova says. “We have a lot to share with each other.”
Polyuha adds, “When real people meet each other, they see real people are different from politics on TV. Having more international students, such as Irina, helps us do this.”
Shigarova’s presence at BU may also prove useful for the future of Russian study abroad. She hopes to bring a group of students back to Bloomsburg after her Fulbright experience ends. Polyuha believes having someone who knows BU firsthand will ease collaboration with Russian universities.
A similar partnership, BU’s joint-degree program with The Financial University in Moscow, Russia, has successfully provided over 165 students from Russia to graduate with a double-degree in economics at BU.
Shigarova also hopes her experience here will show her students at home “a purpose in other languages and that it can be used in real life. Places are getting more real for them when they know you’ve seen it.”
The Fulbright program is an international scholarship opportunity that strives to promote mutual understanding and instill peaceful relations among the United States and other countries by providing scholars the opportunity to experience and work at universities around the world.
In years past, the Fulbright program has provided educational opportunities to more than 325,000 individuals including professors, language assistants, and students from the U.S. and other countries. The program pays special attention to teaching languages that have been deemed important to the future of America, focusing on languages such as Arabic, Chinese, and Russian.
- Courtney Dunn, senior dual English and psychology major

For Irina Shigarova, this fall semester at Bloomsburg University is unlike any that she has ever experienced. Originally from Eastern Siberia, Shigarova was selected as BU’s first Fulbright Language Teaching Assistant with the help of Russian language professor, Mykola Polyuha, who originally came to the United States as a Fulbright scholar to complete his master’s degree at Penn State University.

Shigarova, who previously worked in the Russian city of Irkutsk with a population of approximately 600,000 people, says Bloomsburg provides a much calmer atmosphere than her previous work place. Along with the overall differences in community life, she describes the challenges that she faces on a daily basis, specifically the lack of public transportation and a much different variety of food.

She is also adjusting to a different language – a different style of the English language. Shigarova taught English at Irkutsk Language Centre Bigben, and is therefore more familiar with British English, which she states, is surprisingly different from American English.

These challenges have not stopped Shigarova. Along with teaching a Russian literature course this fall and a culture course in the spring, she is involved in the Russian Culture Club, provides native experience to students through games and books, and serves as a cultural ambassador. She also is furthering her personal interests by taking a dance class. 

When asked what she hopes to bring to BU, Shigarova describes her past experiences with U.S. citizens who expressed the belief that Russians are intimidating or downright “scary.” Her main goal is to eliminate this idea, starting at BU. “The politics do not talk about real people,” Shigarova says. “We have a lot to share with each other.”

Polyuha adds, “When real people meet each other, they see real people are different from politics on TV. Having more international students, such as Irina, helps us do this.”

Shigarova’s presence at BU may also prove useful for the future of Russian study abroad. She hopes to bring a group of students back to Bloomsburg after her Fulbright experience ends. Polyuha believes having someone who knows BU firsthand will ease collaboration with Russian universities.

A similar partnership, BU’s joint-degree program with The Financial University in Moscow, Russia, has successfully provided over 165 students from Russia to graduate with a double-degree in economics at BU.

Shigarova also hopes her experience here will show her students at home “a purpose in other languages and that it can be used in real life. Places are getting more real for them when they know you’ve seen it.”

The Fulbright program is an international scholarship opportunity that strives to promote mutual understanding and instill peaceful relations among the United States and other countries by providing scholars the opportunity to experience and work at universities around the world.

In years past, the Fulbright program has provided educational opportunities to more than 325,000 individuals including professors, language assistants, and students from the U.S. and other countries. The program pays special attention to teaching languages that have been deemed important to the future of America, focusing on languages such as Arabic, Chinese, and Russian.

- Courtney Dunn, senior dual English and psychology major

HuskyUnleashed LanguagesCultures CoCurricularLearning BUAbroad

Following another successful Meet the President event recently on campus, President David L. Soltz had the pleasure of joining the millions of people who have taken the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. The creative fundraiser, made famous on social media by the many ice-dousing videos, has been tremendously successful in raising more than $110.5 million for the ALS Association.

As Soltz said during his challenge, ALS, commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is a relentless degenerative disease that leads slowly to death. To date, there is no cure. Hopefully this will change due to the overwhelming support seen these past few months by our society, including many of Bloomsburg University’s family and friends.

Rising to the challenge to support a worthy cause is nothing new to the university community. It’s almost second nature for our students, faculty and staff.

For example one of BU’s sororities, Sigma Sigma Sigma, recently helped Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital land a $2,210 grant for needed teaching aides for its patients.

Their charitable effort is one of many examples of how BU’s Greek organizations – as well as other student groups – work with our community and support local and national charities like the Ronald McDonald House, Toys for Tots, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and our local women’s shelter and food cupboard.

Of course a prime example of BU’s passion for charity and community support is The Big Event, which annually receives a steady flow of volunteers from our entire student population. In fact, two of the largest on-campus fundraising efforts turned in record level donations this past academic year.

Relay For Life of Bloomsburg University, coordinated by the campus Chapter of Colleges Against Cancer, had more than 800 participants on 50 teamsraise more than $50,000 to benefit the American Cancer Society.

The Multicultural Center’s annual Breast Cancer 5K Walk/Run has raised more than $100,000 since the first step was taken in 2002, including more than $12,000 last fall.

These recent highlights remind BU of the biggest challenge it’s faced and the strongest relief effort it’s pulled together in recent memory. Three years ago this past week, the Flood of 2011 forever changed the landscape and, in many case, the future of the Bloomsburg community. The clear view of the Bloomsburg Fairgrounds from Route 11, where a row of houses once stood, is one permanent reminder. There are a thousand other examples in our immediate region.

BU lost seven days of classes, yet the university continued to work. Students, faculty and staff volunteered with clean up, Red Cross efforts and local emergency governmental agencies, such as call-in centers and supply aide distribution. These volunteer efforts continued well into the fall and spring. It was a clear and emotional snapshot at how much BU values its community and, in many ways, brought the community and school closer together. 

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This week offers another exciting list of events; ranging from Icona Pop tickets going on sale, bingo, a mental game show, a bus trip to Baltimore and of course free pizza at midnight.

Husky Life is full of surprises, so experience campus life like a true Husky by indulging yourself into a hypnotic sleep at the mental game show or kicking off Latino Heritage Month with some Latino bingo.

This Week Unleashed …

  • Trust Your HustleFormer NFL player and Super Bowl champion, Anthony Trucks will be visiting BU’s Multicultural Center on Monday, Sept. 29 at 6 p.m. to present “Trust Your Hustle.” Trucks, a published author and motivational youth speaker, will discuss his knowledge and understanding of the mind and body as it relates to all aspects of fitness and sports. Trucks spent time with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Washington Redskins, and the 2008 Super Bowl champion Pittsburgh Steelers before his career was cut short due to a shoulder injury.
  • Authentic Success — BU’s Multicultural Center presents, “Chasing Authentic Success,” featuring Corey Ciocchetti on Wednesday, Oct. 1, at 7 p.m. Ciocchetti, assistant professor of business ethics and legal studies at the University of Denver, speaks to tens of thousands of people each year presenting a message that will not only stick with you, it will leave you genuinely challenged. Audiences routinely refer to his messages as outright addicting. No matter the setting, venue or occasion, Ciocchetti’s message will engage your mind and motivate your heart to chase authentic success.
  • Latino Bingo — will be held on Friday, Oct. 3, at 10 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose A&B with up to $350 in cash prizes, theme door prizes and free refreshments. Only 25 cents per card, up to six cards at a time. Must be a BU student with student ID and paid Fall ‘14 C.A. free to play.
  • Mental Game Show w/ Michael C. Anthony — will be on Friday, Oct. 3, at 8 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom. Free with BU student ID and pad Fall ‘14 C.A. fee; $3 for others. Anthony’s  award winning show Hypnotized is a critically acclaimed hypnotic masterpiece that is considered the best of it’s kind in the world. You will be amazed as volunteers will fall asleep at the snap of Michael’s finger and obey the most ridiculous suggestions. Michael’s style has been described as an avante garde blend of the human psyche and eye-popping theater.
  • Midnight Pizza w/ The Folded Faces — will be held on Friday, Oct. 3, from midnight to 1:30 a.m., in the KUB Fireside Lounge and Multicultural Center. The Folded Faces, comprised of four Drexel University students, have been influenced by The Black Keys, 3Doors Down and Drive-By Truckers.
  • Icona Pop Tickets — with special guests Five Knives and Lowell Thursday, Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. in the Nelson Field House. Buy your tickets on Oct. 1 and be entered in a drawing for a meet-and-greet with Icona Pop. Tickets available for sale at the Student Activities Office, 350 Kehr Union Building. Icona Pop is a Swedish DJ duo who formed in 2009, with electro housepunk and indie pop music influences. Members Caroline Hjelt and Aino Jawo, who grew up in Stockholm, create music “which you can both laugh and cry to at the same time.”
  • Farmers Market — local vegetables, fruits and more are featured each Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Farmers Market adjacent to Navy Hall and Bakeless Center.

Husky Road Trips!

  • Football Fan Bus — sign up in the Community Activities Office! You must sign up before noon on the Thursday before the game. Buses are available for the Cheyney, Kutztown and Lock Haven games.
  • Baltimore Bus Trip — sign up in the Student Activities Office (KUB 350). Bus departs the Hospital Lot on Saturday, Oct. 4, at 7 a.m. and leaves Baltimore at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 with BU student ID and paid Fall ’14 C.A. fee; $35 with ID only and for guests.
  • Halloween in Salem/Boston — sign up in the Student Activities Office (KUB 350). Join us for this overnight bus trip from Friday, Oct. 31, to Saturday, Nov. 1. Salem, “The Witch City,” will have plenty of Halloween events. Cost, as low as $110, includes two-way coach bus transportation, one night of lodging near Boston and an optional trip into Salem. You’re responsible for securing your own roommates.

HuskyLife HuskyUnleashed BUSpeakerSeries

Patients at Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital will face an easier transition into certain treatment thanks to Bloomsburg University’s Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, who recently helped the local hospital land a $2,210 grant for needed teaching aides.

The children’s hospital will use the grant to purchase MediKin dolls, overlays and toy models of equipment — items that help prepare patients and their families for medical treatment, such as dialysis and oncology. Funding will be provided through a local Robbie Page Memorial (RPM) Grant via the Sigma Sigma Foundation

As a national organization, Sigma Sigma Sigma’s motto is “Sigma Serves Children.” In 1951, the sorority established the RPM Fund for Polio research projects. When a cure for Polio was discovered, the purpose of the RPM shifted focus to play therapy. The foundation helps hundreds of children annually through the RPM Fund, which supports local and national RPM grants.

Bloomsburg’s local Delta Zeta Chapter has spent much of the past year working with Geisigner’s Child Life Services in support of several collection drives, hosting guest speakers at the sorority and planning fall activities with the child patients and families in Danville.

SenseOfCommunity HuskyUnleashed BUGreekLife

There are countless ways to enjoy summer in addition to beach vacations, music concerts and even part-time jobs. In fact, many Huskies took advantage of the gap between May graduation and August move-in to continue their Bloomsburg University experience in a variety of fashions. 

Among the wide range of co-curricular learning opportunities included working internships, conducting research and studying abroad.

Some of standout experiences included students placing among the top in the world in the Odyssey of the Mind competition in Iowa, students making record discoveries at a Hopewell archaeological dig in Ohio and several students showcasing their research - two who won awards - among more than 80 participants at the Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium at Geisinger’s Henry Hood Center for Health Research.

Among the highlights:

HuskySummer CollaborativeLearning CoCurricularLearning HuskyUnleashed

Summer break has began a little differently for a group of anthropology students who put their vacation plans on hold for a memorable field school experience in Ohio. Among the highlights so far, they say, were learning the processes of an archaeological dig, discovering Hopewell artifacts and campfire conversations — along with a growing appreciation of wind and shade.

DeeAnne Wymer, professor of anthropology, and a group of students hit the road each spring in mid-May to spend four weeks in southern Ohio digging at a Hopewell habitation site. The archeological field school experience enables student teams to rely on new imaging technologies to uncover another living site of the Mound Builders from 2,000 years ago.

Life in the Dig

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