SLED (Students Linked to the Education of the Deaf) promotes professional development by having guest speakers come to challenge our students. This month’s special speakers were the Walter family.Three of their five children attended Camp HERO (Here Everyone Really is One) in July 2014. Annabelle and Ally were returning campers, whereas Austin was able to go for the first time.

The children, as well as their parents, shared their perspective on the the camp. Mr. and Mrs. Walter also shared with BU students insights into raising their children all with varying degrees of hearing and various language needs.

In attendance at this month’s meeting were students of various majors registered with an area of concentration in Education of the Deaf/HH. Other guests were students currently taking ASL 1. The room was filled to capacity.

SLED also exists to raise funds to provide camperships to deaf or hard-of-hearing children who might not otherwise be able to attend Camp HERO, which takes place at Camp Victory in Millville during the last week in July each year. The campership monies are distributed by the Camp HERO Board of Directors on an as needed basis to families applying for camperships and submitting the required documentation.

During the meeting, SLED presented a $1,100 check to Jodie Ackerman, camp director, which was a highlight to have campers there while we made the presentation.

SLED meets the first Thursday of every month at 7 p.m. in Navy Hall 207. Meetings are open to students of all majors.

SLED Executive Board

  • President - Natalie Roca
  • Vice President - Grace Sipler
  • Treasurer - Schylar Cook
  • Secretary - Valerie Mussey
  • Fundraising - Jenna Diefenbacher and Kelli Grubb 
  • Public Relations - Rachel Barlage and Kaitlin Scudy
  • Historian - Kate Mochnacz and Heidi Stoudt
  • Advisors - Deborah Stryker, Ph.d., and Patricia Stoudt, Ph.D.

DeafEducation COE HuskyUnleashed SenseOfCommunity

My family comes from the Dominican Republic, and I have always been very proud of my culture and where I’m from. I feel I get to see the world from two different perspectives.
Most of my childhood was spent getting together with all of my extended family, making endless amounts of food, and dancing to Bachata, Merengue, or Salsa music. For me, my culture has taught me to embrace life, the people around me, and always work hard for what I want.
I have dreams of working at John Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore. It is known as the top hospital in the nation. While this might see like a big dream, I am motivated to work as hard as I can to achieve that goal because I want to prove that no matter where you come from, you can be successful.
I am a member of Student Organization of Latinos (SOL). I am a consultant at The Writing Center, I am a member of B-Smart, and I am also a mentor for the Aqui y Ahora program.
Coming from the Latino culture and moving to Bloomsburg has been a different experience for me. I started off in the ACT 101 program, and I was only the second in my family to go to a four-year university and actually leave home. My family has always been a huge support system for me and constantly encouraged me to go to college.
— Darianny Antonio ’17, medical imaging major

My family comes from the Dominican Republic, and I have always been very proud of my culture and where I’m from. I feel I get to see the world from two different perspectives.

Most of my childhood was spent getting together with all of my extended family, making endless amounts of food, and dancing to Bachata, Merengue, or Salsa music. For me, my culture has taught me to embrace life, the people around me, and always work hard for what I want.

I have dreams of working at John Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore. It is known as the top hospital in the nation. While this might see like a big dream, I am motivated to work as hard as I can to achieve that goal because I want to prove that no matter where you come from, you can be successful.

I am a member of Student Organization of Latinos (SOL). I am a consultant at The Writing Center, I am a member of B-Smart, and I am also a mentor for the Aqui y Ahora program.

Coming from the Latino culture and moving to Bloomsburg has been a different experience for me. I started off in the ACT 101 program, and I was only the second in my family to go to a four-year university and actually leave home. My family has always been a huge support system for me and constantly encouraged me to go to college.

 Darianny Antonio ’17, medical imaging major

HuskyUnleashed SenseOfCommunity AGreatPlaceToBeYou MulticulturalAffairs

Jackie Cruz, known for her role as Flaca on the critically acclaimed Netflix series Orange is the New Black, highlighted Bloomsburg University’s celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month with a presentation in the Kehr Union Building and a meet-and-greet in the Multicultural Center.

Cruz  a native of New York City, Los Angeles and the Dominican Republic  spoke to students about her journey to stardom, which was nearly derailed by a near fatal car accident that almost left her paralyzed. She also discussed her strides in acting on the hit Netflix show and building upon her musical career.

Cruz’s messaged highlighted the importance of overcoming adversity, taking pride in your heritage and surrounding yourself with good people. She capped her presentation with acoustic performances of two of her singles.

Unleashing the You at BU

In celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, a personal perspective from a few of our many proud Latino students.

BUSpeakerSeries MulticulturalAffairs OrangeIsTheNewBlack SenseOfCommunity

As someone with two Latino parents, I was always taught to be proud of being Latino. But what did that mean?
Well to me that meant eating great food, for example Latino culture is big on family and unity. So every Sunday my family would get together at my house for a nice relaxing diner. The usual entree would be pork or chicken with white rice and vegetables, an authentic Latino food staple. 
My sense of pride in being Latino came from my ancestors, as well. To elaborate, my father would always talk about how I was the last of the Mohicans, in regards to being the youngest child. I always found the phrase to be a nice sentiment. In which we as Latino people had pride in the history we derived from.
Personally, being Latino is not my full drive for success, but it does assist. Being Latino and having the chance to go to a university I wanted to grasp the opportunity, and so I did.
I thought, “How many of my Latino friends went to college or even got a chance to?” With that idea in mind it made me just want to work harder and prove that a Latino can do what anyone else in college can accomplish. I also thought, “I’m going to go to and graduate college not just for my self, but for all the Latinos who can not.”
Being Latino I try to surround myself in similar people and campus activities that reinforce my identity and remind me of home.
For example I missed hanging around Latino people at college, so I joined Student Organization of Latinos (SOL) Club that deals in learning and sharing Latino culture. I got the opportunity to work in a diverse work place as a Latino with other Latinos so I applied at the Office of Multicultural Affairs.
I then thought of a major that I enjoyed and had little diversity, so I declared my major in digital forensics. And although I am only the fourth person to go to college in my family, I am still as motivated as if I were the first person to go to college and will work hard as so.
— Conrado Ramos ‘17, digital forensics major

As someone with two Latino parents, I was always taught to be proud of being Latino. But what did that mean?

Well to me that meant eating great food, for example Latino culture is big on family and unity. So every Sunday my family would get together at my house for a nice relaxing diner. The usual entree would be pork or chicken with white rice and vegetables, an authentic Latino food staple. 

My sense of pride in being Latino came from my ancestors, as well. To elaborate, my father would always talk about how I was the last of the Mohicans, in regards to being the youngest child. I always found the phrase to be a nice sentiment. In which we as Latino people had pride in the history we derived from.

Personally, being Latino is not my full drive for success, but it does assist. Being Latino and having the chance to go to a university I wanted to grasp the opportunity, and so I did.

I thought, “How many of my Latino friends went to college or even got a chance to?” With that idea in mind it made me just want to work harder and prove that a Latino can do what anyone else in college can accomplish. I also thought, “I’m going to go to and graduate college not just for my self, but for all the Latinos who can not.”

Being Latino I try to surround myself in similar people and campus activities that reinforce my identity and remind me of home.

For example I missed hanging around Latino people at college, so I joined Student Organization of Latinos (SOL) Club that deals in learning and sharing Latino culture. I got the opportunity to work in a diverse work place as a Latino with other Latinos so I applied at the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

I then thought of a major that I enjoyed and had little diversity, so I declared my major in digital forensics. And although I am only the fourth person to go to college in my family, I am still as motivated as if I were the first person to go to college and will work hard as so.

 Conrado Ramos ‘17, digital forensics major

HuskyUnleashed SenseOfCommunity AGreatPlaceToBeYou MulticulturalAffairs

Bloomsburg University is hosting the 2014 Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) Women’s Consortium Conference on Sept. 25 to 26, featuring a wellness room, multiple workshops and Sarah Kay as the keynote speaker. Conference fees start at $90 for non-members, $75 for members and students are free.

The Women’s Consortium is designed to have women in the State System collaborate and develop leadership skills. Students, faculty and staff are invited to participate in this on-campus consortium, which will be based from three institutes — Women’s Student Leadership, Women’s Faculty Leadership and Women’s Staff Leadership.

The keynote speaker, Sarah Kay, started writing poetry when she was 14. During her young career, Kay has often competed well on stage against more experienced poets. Consortium participants will experience first-hand Kay’s talent, which she uses as an empowerment tool.

This consortium gives the opportunity for women through out the State System to connect with more than just their campus. It proceeds to provide woman with a mentorship and a network to collaborate with projects.

Denise Chaytor – Zugarek, retention specialist and apart of the Trio Student Support Service, says the motto for the conference is “One Strong Voice.” Providing information, to women of all nature, which they can use in every day life. They will feel empowered to create positive change in their school or community.

For more information contact Chaytor-Zagarek at dchaytor@bloomu.edu.

— Samantha Gross, sophomore telecommunications major

CollaborativeLearning SenseOfCommunity