Mariam Sarkessian, a management major, recently completed a two-week job shadow with Comcast’s corporate headquarters in Philadelphia through Bloomsburg University’s Sophomore Experiential Learning (SEL) Program.
The program, designed to give students an opportunity to see their potential career field first-hand, enabled Sarkessian to witness the daily activity of the country’s largest cable company and Internet service provider. Sarkessian described her experience as enlightening and richly memorable.
“Seeing daily activity at the headquarters has helped me confirm that I’d like to work at a large company that has a powerful role in the world,” Sarkessian says. “I’ve gained useful insight about how to level-handedly deal with problems and make decisions with customers and the company in mind.”
In addition to a possible internship opportunity, Sarkessian says her SEL experience provided her with many more business contacts. She also may have discovered a new career track.
“Being able to help out with (the Lab Week project) even though I was just shadowing was an exciting experience and opened my mind in looking for ways to make processes more efficient,” Sarkessian says. “Most importantly, … I had not known that project managing could be a career. Now I’m eager to pursue and get the right qualifications for it.”
Sarkessian shadowed Ted Hodgins, Class of 1989, senior director of technology and product: customer service.

Mariam Sarkessian, a management major, recently completed a two-week job shadow with Comcast’s corporate headquarters in Philadelphia through Bloomsburg University’s Sophomore Experiential Learning (SEL) Program.

The program, designed to give students an opportunity to see their potential career field first-hand, enabled Sarkessian to witness the daily activity of the country’s largest cable company and Internet service provider. Sarkessian described her experience as enlightening and richly memorable.

“Seeing daily activity at the headquarters has helped me confirm that I’d like to work at a large company that has a powerful role in the world,” Sarkessian says. “I’ve gained useful insight about how to level-handedly deal with problems and make decisions with customers and the company in mind.”

In addition to a possible internship opportunity, Sarkessian says her SEL experience provided her with many more business contacts. She also may have discovered a new career track.

“Being able to help out with (the Lab Week project) even though I was just shadowing was an exciting experience and opened my mind in looking for ways to make processes more efficient,” Sarkessian says. “Most importantly, … I had not known that project managing could be a career. Now I’m eager to pursue and get the right qualifications for it.”

Sarkessian shadowed Ted Hodgins, Class of 1989, senior director of technology and product: customer service.

ProfessionalU HuskyUnleashed CoCurricularLearning HuskySummer management business

To kick off the summer a group of students from Bloomsburg University’s Department of Environmental, Geographical, and Geological Sciences spent three weeks in California's Mojave Desert. The adventurous learning experience was a part of the department’s new Special Topics in Field Geology course — designed to give students an opportunity to observe a wide variety of earth processes, apply their knowledge and reinforce skills in geological observation and interpretation. 

By participating in this intense, field-based course, 13 students got a first-hand encounter with the geology and environmental issues of the western United States. Led by faculty Chris Whisner, Jennifer Whisner and Cynthia Venn, the group roughed it at rustic campsites, grilled trout caught in mountain streams, worked on field notebooks until late in the evening and endured rain, snow, hail and 116-degree heat.

At the same time, the group said it marveled at the mining impacts, stunning geology, and complex water resource issues they encountered on their 1,800-mile trek.  

Each student had opportunities to show off their knowledge through lecturing at two stops, while faculty displayed the accompanying posters. Other highlights:

  • several sites at Mono Lake, Owen’s Lake, LA Aqueduct, Hoover Dam, Ash Meadows showcased many of the ideas students studied in Water Resources Management and Ground Hydrology
  • students were assigned to sketch an unfamiliar landscape and identify as many features as they could, based on the trip. Most students were able to pick out most of the features (fault scarps and fault-block mountains, volcanoes, alluvial fans, stream-carved valleys, springs, glacial features, intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks, and sedimentary rocks) from their viewpoint across the valley.

According to Jennifer Whisner, up until that point the student didn’t really realize how much they had learned in the week or so they’d been out there!

In their final synthesis paper, nearly every student noted that actually seeing mile-high mountains, volcanoes, earthquake scars, picturesque landscapes carved by alpine glaciers and rushing water, and irrigation in one of the most water-starved parts of the U.S. helped them better understand concepts they had discussed in class, and better grasp the scale of features they had seen only in textbook diagrams.

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Eight ParenteBeard summer accounting interns recently helped Habitat for Humanity of Berks County ReStore prepare for their grand re-opening slated for July.
In addition to the accounting work the summer interns are performing and observing, for the first time, the firm’s summer interns are demonstrating ParenteBeard’s mission to serve the communities where team members live and work by participating in charitable community service activities in central Pennsylvania.
Tara Boyd, of Bloomsburg University; Eric Hiser, of Bloomsburg University; Guy Lewis, of Penn State; Katelyn Macbeth, of Messiah College; April Maschke, of Albright College; Shaunna Nesmith, of York College; Jordan Sallavanti,. of Kutztown University; and Kayla Snyder, of West Chester University, assisted the store’s executive director, Tim Daley, by cleaning, painting, redecorating, reorganizing, rebuilding and moving furniture.

Eight ParenteBeard summer accounting interns recently helped Habitat for Humanity of Berks County ReStore prepare for their grand re-opening slated for July.

In addition to the accounting work the summer interns are performing and observing, for the first time, the firm’s summer interns are demonstrating ParenteBeard’s mission to serve the communities where team members live and work by participating in charitable community service activities in central Pennsylvania.

Tara Boyd, of Bloomsburg University; Eric Hiser, of Bloomsburg University; Guy Lewis, of Penn State; Katelyn Macbeth, of Messiah College; April Maschke, of Albright College; Shaunna Nesmith, of York College; Jordan Sallavanti,. of Kutztown University; and Kayla Snyder, of West Chester University, assisted the store’s executive director, Tim Daley, by cleaning, painting, redecorating, reorganizing, rebuilding and moving furniture.

HuskyUnleashed CoCurricularLearning HuskySummer accounting ProfessionalU

Newly minted graduates go in all directions once they walk the commencement stage. For one Husky, her graduation journey went international.

Jeanine Hubert, an anthropology major, completed her undergraduate degree commitment this summer with a four-week study abroad research program in Nicaragua. Through the Maderas Rainforest Conservancy, Hubert spent most of June studying primate behavior and rainforest ecology on the island of Ometep — settled in the middle of the largest freshwater lake in Central America.

Specifically, Hubert observed two groups of monkeys native to the island collecting 25 hours worth of data in the rainforest. Through her research, Hubert found there may be a strong correlation between the primates’ eating behavior and the evolution of their tails.

In addition to her field success and degree completion, Hubert admitted she also discovered from her time abroad something just as long lasting — if not more memorable — within herself.

There was a moment I looked around and realized that I don’t know what force brought me to this place, but there’s a piece of my heart that will always be tucked away on the island of Ometepe,” Hubert said. “So cliche right?”

HuskyUnleashed BUAbroad anthropology HuskySummer

Bloomsburg University’s Odyssey of the Mind program was recently recognized as one of the best in the world competing in the annual World Final for Odyssey of the Mind, held at Iowa State University.
Both of BU’s teams placed in the top four out of 833 teams representing 43 states and 28 countries with more than 26,000 attendees.
Participating for BU’s two teams were Shaide Moronta, Jordan Galan, Valarie Mussey, Alea Bostic-Davey, Morgen Hatton, Mariam Sarkessian, Jamelisk, Timothy Keiper, Jacqueline Hauck, Nickolas Lloyd and Kristin Burke.
The teams were coached by Chaza Abdul, advisor, Loreen Powell, Evren Eryilmaz and Cenan Abdul-Al.
Beyond exploration for creative thinking and innovation, both teams used different skills and knowledge to solve two complex problems using arts, science, technology, literature, history, math, music, business, and other skills to create solutions.
"The team exceeded every expectation I had,” Abdul said. “We had many practices, and we were working as one family for a long-time. I am proud of them and thankful to the provost, Bloomsburg officials, parents, families and friends, our sponsors and supporters who helped us achieve this goal with every possibility with had."  

Bloomsburg University’s Odyssey of the Mind program was recently recognized as one of the best in the world competing in the annual World Final for Odyssey of the Mind, held at Iowa State University.

Both of BU’s teams placed in the top four out of 833 teams representing 43 states and 28 countries with more than 26,000 attendees.

Participating for BU’s two teams were Shaide Moronta, Jordan Galan, Valarie Mussey, Alea Bostic-Davey, Morgen Hatton, Mariam Sarkessian, Jamelisk, Timothy Keiper, Jacqueline Hauck, Nickolas Lloyd and Kristin Burke.

The teams were coached by Chaza Abdul, advisor, Loreen Powell, Evren Eryilmaz and Cenan Abdul-Al.

Beyond exploration for creative thinking and innovation, both teams used different skills and knowledge to solve two complex problems using arts, science, technology, literature, history, math, music, business, and other skills to create solutions.

"The team exceeded every expectation I had,” Abdul said. “We had many practices, and we were working as one family for a long-time. I am proud of them and thankful to the provost, Bloomsburg officials, parents, families and friends, our sponsors and supporters who helped us achieve this goal with every possibility with had."  

CoCurricularLearning HuskyUnleashed

When you get called out on the basketball court, you must step up. It’s part of the competitive spirit of the game. And this unwritten rule of the court has apparently made its way into this offseason … for a good cause.

Bill Cleary, head women’s basketball coach at Bloomsburg University, accepted the #Chillin4Charity challenge Wednesday, June 25, from Kyle Adams, head women’s basketball coach at Cheyney University – and in the process – called out three other Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference women’s basketball coaches.

Surrounded by an enthusiastic crowd of youth baseball campers at Danny Hale Field at Redman Stadium, Cleary fulfilled his challenge by being doused with two buckets of ice water, assisted by two of his players, Jocelyn Ford and Brianna Dudeck.

Cheyney and Bloomsburg are just two of the latest women’s basketball programs to participate in the #Chillin4Charity cold water challenge, which has included Notre Dame, UConn and Oklahoma. Initiated by Niya Butts, head women’s basketball coach at Arizona University, the challenge pits coaches and players with the decision to be dunked with water or donate to escape the ice water shower.

Proceeds benefit the Kay Yow Fund, an organization created in honor of legendary NC State women’s basketball coach Kay Yow, who died of breast cancer in 2009.

#Chillin4Charity Rules: If you accept and complete the challenge within 48 hours, your challenger will donate $50 to the Kay Yow Fund. If you fail to accept the challenge, you owe the Kay Yow Fund $250. Student-athletes participating are donating community service hours.

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G’day Huskies! Five students and a recent graduate have spent three weeks of summer traveling through Australia exploring many different activities and cultures the continent offers. Led by West Chester University faculty member Jason Phillips, along with nine others from various university across the country, these Huskies ventured on a 22-day journey through some of Australia’s most beautiful locations.
Evelynn Guzman, a student in the School Counseling College Student Affairs (M.Ed.) graduate program, highly recommends going abroad as she never did in her undergraduate years but feels she learned more about life and herself on this trip than she ever could have imagined.
Through scuba diving in the Great Barrier Reef, hiking through some of Australia’s best-known natural landmarks in the Northern Territory, surfing some waves on beautiful Bondi Beach and attending a performance of Mozart’s Haffner Symphony at the world famous Sydney Opera House (and many more), the students rank their exploration and education tour one of the most memorable experiences of their lives.
Pictured (L-R): Kelsi Cantone ’14, Evelynn Guzman ‘13, graduate school ‘15, Lindsey Dotzel ‘15, Erin Richardson ‘16 and Maria Bostjancic ‘16.

G’day Huskies! Five students and a recent graduate have spent three weeks of summer traveling through Australia exploring many different activities and cultures the continent offers. Led by West Chester University faculty member Jason Phillips, along with nine others from various university across the country, these Huskies ventured on a 22-day journey through some of Australia’s most beautiful locations.

Evelynn Guzman, a student in the School Counseling College Student Affairs (M.Ed.) graduate program, highly recommends going abroad as she never did in her undergraduate years but feels she learned more about life and herself on this trip than she ever could have imagined.

Through scuba diving in the Great Barrier Reef, hiking through some of Australia’s best-known natural landmarks in the Northern Territory, surfing some waves on beautiful Bondi Beach and attending a performance of Mozart’s Haffner Symphony at the world famous Sydney Opera House (and many more), the students rank their exploration and education tour one of the most memorable experiences of their lives.

Pictured (L-R): Kelsi Cantone ’14, Evelynn Guzman ‘13, graduate school ‘15, Lindsey Dotzel ‘15, Erin Richardson ‘16 and Maria Bostjancic ‘16.

HuskyUnleashed HuskySummer BUAbroad