SLED (Students Linked to the Education of the Deaf) promotes professional development by having guest speakers come to challenge our students. This month’s special speakers were the Walter family.Three of their five children attended Camp HERO (Here Everyone Really is One) in July 2014. Annabelle and Ally were returning campers, whereas Austin was able to go for the first time.

The children, as well as their parents, shared their perspective on the the camp. Mr. and Mrs. Walter also shared with BU students insights into raising their children all with varying degrees of hearing and various language needs.

In attendance at this month’s meeting were students of various majors registered with an area of concentration in Education of the Deaf/HH. Other guests were students currently taking ASL 1. The room was filled to capacity.

SLED also exists to raise funds to provide camperships to deaf or hard-of-hearing children who might not otherwise be able to attend Camp HERO, which takes place at Camp Victory in Millville during the last week in July each year. The campership monies are distributed by the Camp HERO Board of Directors on an as needed basis to families applying for camperships and submitting the required documentation.

During the meeting, SLED presented a $1,100 check to Jodie Ackerman, camp director, which was a highlight to have campers there while we made the presentation.

SLED meets the first Thursday of every month at 7 p.m. in Navy Hall 207. Meetings are open to students of all majors.

SLED Executive Board

  • President - Natalie Roca
  • Vice President - Grace Sipler
  • Treasurer - Schylar Cook
  • Secretary - Valerie Mussey
  • Fundraising - Jenna Diefenbacher and Kelli Grubb 
  • Public Relations - Rachel Barlage and Kaitlin Scudy
  • Historian - Kate Mochnacz and Heidi Stoudt
  • Advisors - Deborah Stryker, Ph.d., and Patricia Stoudt, Ph.D.

DeafEducation COE HuskyUnleashed SenseOfCommunity

When I made the decision to move to Austin, Texas, a lot of people rolled their eyes, some laughed, gave sincere well wishes and some people told me I was crazy.
“Do you have family there? Do you have a job lined up?” They asked.
The answer to both questions was “no.”
However, if Bloomsburg University and the Husky Ambassadors taught me anything it was that our alumni bleed Maroon and Gold long after they graduate. I contacted the Alumni Association and found there were a number of alumni living in Austin. I wanted to pick their brains, to create a network.
I introduced myself to any Husky I could connect with in Austin. I explained my intentions and crossed my fingers that someone would be willing to help. The response was overwhelming. Almost every person I contacted offered encouragement, advice or to meet with me and show me around the city.
I met an alumni couple that moved to Texas hours after their own commencement ceremony. We hit it off immediately and our conversation flowed effortlessly with the common undercurrent of Husky Pride.
Encouraged by a number of BU grads, I realized I could make the transition to Austin. Although I am now 1,500 miles away from Husky territory, the BU connection has remained a strong presence in my life. I urge you to take advantage of it no matter where life leads you.— Sarie Tocket ‘13
Professional U Career Connections
Harrisburg: Student-Alumni Networking Reception
When: Friday Oct. 17, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Off-Campus
Cocktail Reception Recommended for Juniors and Seniors. Cash bar (Must be 21 and show photo ID to be served) Business attire required. Bus transportation from BU provided/or travel on your own (Depart BU at 4 p.m., Return at 10 p.m.)
Space is limited - RSVP required!
Must bring student ID for check-in! As you transition from life as a college student to that of a young professional connecting to the local community where you live and work can help you grow both professionally and personally. Students are invited to attend this special cocktail reception at the National Civil War Museum to network with BU graduates from the Harrisburg region representing various career fields and industries in that area. This event features presentations from the regional Chamber of Commerce and alumni panelists who will speak about community engagement opportunities.
NEPA: Student-Alumni Networking Reception
When: Friday, Oct. 24, 6 to 8 p.m.
Where: Off-Campus

Cocktail reception Recommended for Juniors and Seniors. Cash bar (Must be 21 and show photo ID to be served) Business attire required. Bus transportation from BU provided/or travel on your own (Depart BU at 5 p.m., Return at 9 p.m.)
Space is limited - RSVP required!  
Must bring student ID for check-in! As you transition from life as a college student to that of a young professional, connecting to the local community where you live and work can help you grow both professionally and personally. Students are invited to attend this special cocktail reception at Mohegan Sun to network with BU graduates from NEPA representing various career fields and industries in that area. This event features presentations from the regional Chamber of Commerce and alumni panelists who will speak about community engagement opportunities.

When I made the decision to move to Austin, Texas, a lot of people rolled their eyes, some laughed, gave sincere well wishes and some people told me I was crazy.

“Do you have family there? Do you have a job lined up?” They asked.

The answer to both questions was “no.”

However, if Bloomsburg University and the Husky Ambassadors taught me anything it was that our alumni bleed Maroon and Gold long after they graduate. I contacted the Alumni Association and found there were a number of alumni living in Austin. I wanted to pick their brains, to create a network.

I introduced myself to any Husky I could connect with in Austin. I explained my intentions and crossed my fingers that someone would be willing to help. The response was overwhelming. Almost every person I contacted offered encouragement, advice or to meet with me and show me around the city.

I met an alumni couple that moved to Texas hours after their own commencement ceremony. We hit it off immediately and our conversation flowed effortlessly with the common undercurrent of Husky Pride.

Encouraged by a number of BU grads, I realized I could make the transition to Austin. Although I am now 1,500 miles away from Husky territory, the BU connection has remained a strong presence in my life. I urge you to take advantage of it no matter where life leads you.

— Sarie Tocket ‘13

Professional U Career Connections

Cocktail Reception Recommended for Juniors and Seniors. Cash bar (Must be 21 and show photo ID to be served) Business attire required. Bus transportation from BU provided/or travel on your own (Depart BU at 4 p.m., Return at 10 p.m.)

Space is limited - RSVP required!

Must bring student ID for check-in! As you transition from life as a college student to that of a young professional connecting to the local community where you live and work can help you grow both professionally and personally. Students are invited to attend this special cocktail reception at the National Civil War Museum to network with BU graduates from the Harrisburg region representing various career fields and industries in that area. This event features presentations from the regional Chamber of Commerce and alumni panelists who will speak about community engagement opportunities.

Cocktail reception Recommended for Juniors and Seniors. Cash bar (Must be 21 and show photo ID to be served) Business attire required. Bus transportation from BU provided/or travel on your own (Depart BU at 5 p.m., Return at 9 p.m.)

Space is limited - RSVP required!  

Must bring student ID for check-in! As you transition from life as a college student to that of a young professional, connecting to the local community where you live and work can help you grow both professionally and personally. Students are invited to attend this special cocktail reception at Mohegan Sun to network with BU graduates from NEPA representing various career fields and industries in that area. This event features presentations from the regional Chamber of Commerce and alumni panelists who will speak about community engagement opportunities.

HuskyUnleashed ProfessionalU BUAlumni

My family comes from the Dominican Republic, and I have always been very proud of my culture and where I’m from. I feel I get to see the world from two different perspectives.
Most of my childhood was spent getting together with all of my extended family, making endless amounts of food, and dancing to Bachata, Merengue, or Salsa music. For me, my culture has taught me to embrace life, the people around me, and always work hard for what I want.
I have dreams of working at John Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore. It is known as the top hospital in the nation. While this might see like a big dream, I am motivated to work as hard as I can to achieve that goal because I want to prove that no matter where you come from, you can be successful.
I am a member of Student Organization of Latinos (SOL). I am a consultant at The Writing Center, I am a member of B-Smart, and I am also a mentor for the Aqui y Ahora program.
Coming from the Latino culture and moving to Bloomsburg has been a different experience for me. I started off in the ACT 101 program, and I was only the second in my family to go to a four-year university and actually leave home. My family has always been a huge support system for me and constantly encouraged me to go to college.
— Darianny Antonio ’17, medical imaging major

My family comes from the Dominican Republic, and I have always been very proud of my culture and where I’m from. I feel I get to see the world from two different perspectives.

Most of my childhood was spent getting together with all of my extended family, making endless amounts of food, and dancing to Bachata, Merengue, or Salsa music. For me, my culture has taught me to embrace life, the people around me, and always work hard for what I want.

I have dreams of working at John Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore. It is known as the top hospital in the nation. While this might see like a big dream, I am motivated to work as hard as I can to achieve that goal because I want to prove that no matter where you come from, you can be successful.

I am a member of Student Organization of Latinos (SOL). I am a consultant at The Writing Center, I am a member of B-Smart, and I am also a mentor for the Aqui y Ahora program.

Coming from the Latino culture and moving to Bloomsburg has been a different experience for me. I started off in the ACT 101 program, and I was only the second in my family to go to a four-year university and actually leave home. My family has always been a huge support system for me and constantly encouraged me to go to college.

 Darianny Antonio ’17, medical imaging major

HuskyUnleashed SenseOfCommunity AGreatPlaceToBeYou MulticulturalAffairs

Olivia Edelman was certain that she wanted to study abroad. Her older sister had studied in Barcelona, Spain during her college career, and she was in love with the idea of going to school in the very same city.

Edelman visited Bloomsburg University’s Office of Global Education as the first step to make her dream happen. What she learned from director Luke Springman was that a semester in Barcelona was not compatible with the course requirements for her major in English secondary education. Instead, Springman suggested that she do her semester abroad in Denmark, a country that BU had not yet sent any of its students.

At first she was not sure. She knew nothing about Denmark and had never even considered it as an option. However, after a bit of research about Aarhus, the city she would be living in, she had made up her mind to become the first Bloomsburg University student to ever study abroad at Aarhus University.

“I was inspired to go to a country that, along with many other people, I do not know much about,” said Edelman. “It was the best experience of my lifetime.”

There are countless benefits of a study abroad experience in college. Students have the opportunity not just to learn about the culture and the people of the countries they visit, but also the cultures of other exchange students. During her semester in Denmark the spring of her junior year, Edelman studied alongside new friends from Australia, Canada and the many other nations that her classmates represented. She also took the opportunity to travel to other countries near Denmark during her free time, including her dream destination of Spain.

As an education major, gaining firsthand experience of how foreign classrooms operate was invaluable. After graduating from BU, Edelman is even contemplating returning to Denmark to teach.

“It was really nice, especially studying to be a teacher, to see how other classroom setups are,” said Edelman. She recalls how Danish classes are much more informal than those that she has taken in the United States. Students call teachers by their first names, and schedules are more relaxed, with classes not always meeting multiple times a week. Some courses even had a different instructor for each unit. “It was really interesting for me to observe.”

Above all, the life lessons that Edelman learned are unique to her study abroad experience. “I went by myself, so I didn’t really know what to expect. I really had to be independent.”

She offers encouragement to any BU student thinking about studying abroad. “Many people think they can’t do it or they can’t afford it… But it’s manageable and really just the best experience ever. Definitely go to another country, because you learn so much about yourself.”

BU has partnerships with over 17 universities around the world, and the Office of Global Education on campus can help students take advantage of these opportunities and more. Study abroad programs exist for full or multiple semesters or for short-term experiences of just a few weeks.

You can read about Edelman’s experiences at Aarhus University in Denmark in her travel blog!

- Nick Cellucci, junior mass communications major

BUAbroad HuskyUnleashed CoCurricularLearning HuskyConnections SecondaryEducation

Karl Kapp had the kind of week most instructional technology professors only dream of when he was asked to be an “author” of a course on one of the country’s leading online learning companies: Lynda.com.

It all started when Kapp was a presenter at the Learning Solutions Conference in Orlando, Fla., where he caught the eye of Aaron Quigley. Quigley, a content manager for Lynda.com, is responsible for curating authors and courses that meet viewers’ training needs.

Quigley explains that the ideal candidate is a passionate subject matter expert who can deliver content in a conversational tone. “When I first saw Dr. Kapp at Learning Solutions, he connected with his audience in a way that engaged the learners and transformed typically passive viewers into active participants in the presentation.”

Lynda.com courses generally come in two different formats: screen-capture and live-action. Screen capture courses are useful for lessons that are entirely software-based. That way, a student can follow an author’s mouse and go through each step of the program. More conceptual courses are often live-action. Kapp’s presentation skills, along with the concepts he taught, made his course appropriate for a mix of live-action, screen-capture and B-roll footage.

Kapp compared writing the scripts for the chapters to writing a book. When it came time to shoot, it was like turning that book into a movie.

Lights, Camera, Action!

True to California style, Kapp received the Hollywood treatment during his five-day stay on the set, including makeup and wardrobe changes. Once Kapp heard “Action,” he came out running.

“It felt naturally fast-paced. It wasn’t hectic, but it was fast-paced,” says Kapp.

Kapp’s role as “the instructor” for Lynda.com differed greatly from classroom teaching. In a classroom, a major part of Kapp’s teaching style is his interaction with the students. With no student energy to feed off of and no breaks in between lectures, he says it was work to maintain high-level energy for the entire performance. Another challenge Kapp faced was the inability to improvise; he had to stick to the script.

“I really needed to just focus on reading the words on the teleprompter. Nothing felt like a normal classroom,” says Kapp, “It really didn’t feel like teaching at all.”

Kapp was comfortable in front of the camera, but he did not foresee the strain production would place on his vocal cords. Day two was filled with non-stop voice recording, he recalls, as he completed 29 of his 40 chapters. Each chapter took several takes that all demanded the same level of enthusiasm. A little tea called “throat coat,” however, allowed him to get the job done.

Kapp praises his experience with Lynda.com and the atmosphere on set. Everyone was friendly and professional, and everything they did went toward improving their learners’ experience, he explains.

“They really went out of their way to make you feel welcome and to focus on the student’s experience watching the instruction,” says Kapp.

When asked about his experience with Kapp, Quigley shared a similar sentiment. “Working with Dr. Kapp is a delight. His organization of course content, passion for engaging instruction, and utmost professionalism make him an ideal lynda.com author,” says Quigley.

It is no surprise then that Kapp is looking into working with Lynda.com on more courses. Hopefully next time he will get to meet Lynda  – cofounder and executive chair Lynda Weinman, that is

While Kapp’s course has yet to be released, members of the BU campus community have full access to Lynda.com courses and tutorials at Lynda.bloomu.edu.

- Sean Williams, senior English major

HuskyUnleashed gamification InstructionalTechnology CollaborativeLearning Lynda ScienceTechnology

As someone with two Latino parents, I was always taught to be proud of being Latino. But what did that mean?
Well to me that meant eating great food, for example Latino culture is big on family and unity. So every Sunday my family would get together at my house for a nice relaxing diner. The usual entree would be pork or chicken with white rice and vegetables, an authentic Latino food staple. 
My sense of pride in being Latino came from my ancestors, as well. To elaborate, my father would always talk about how I was the last of the Mohicans, in regards to being the youngest child. I always found the phrase to be a nice sentiment. In which we as Latino people had pride in the history we derived from.
Personally, being Latino is not my full drive for success, but it does assist. Being Latino and having the chance to go to a university I wanted to grasp the opportunity, and so I did.
I thought, “How many of my Latino friends went to college or even got a chance to?” With that idea in mind it made me just want to work harder and prove that a Latino can do what anyone else in college can accomplish. I also thought, “I’m going to go to and graduate college not just for my self, but for all the Latinos who can not.”
Being Latino I try to surround myself in similar people and campus activities that reinforce my identity and remind me of home.
For example I missed hanging around Latino people at college, so I joined Student Organization of Latinos (SOL) Club that deals in learning and sharing Latino culture. I got the opportunity to work in a diverse work place as a Latino with other Latinos so I applied at the Office of Multicultural Affairs.
I then thought of a major that I enjoyed and had little diversity, so I declared my major in digital forensics. And although I am only the fourth person to go to college in my family, I am still as motivated as if I were the first person to go to college and will work hard as so.
— Conrado Ramos ‘17, digital forensics major

As someone with two Latino parents, I was always taught to be proud of being Latino. But what did that mean?

Well to me that meant eating great food, for example Latino culture is big on family and unity. So every Sunday my family would get together at my house for a nice relaxing diner. The usual entree would be pork or chicken with white rice and vegetables, an authentic Latino food staple. 

My sense of pride in being Latino came from my ancestors, as well. To elaborate, my father would always talk about how I was the last of the Mohicans, in regards to being the youngest child. I always found the phrase to be a nice sentiment. In which we as Latino people had pride in the history we derived from.

Personally, being Latino is not my full drive for success, but it does assist. Being Latino and having the chance to go to a university I wanted to grasp the opportunity, and so I did.

I thought, “How many of my Latino friends went to college or even got a chance to?” With that idea in mind it made me just want to work harder and prove that a Latino can do what anyone else in college can accomplish. I also thought, “I’m going to go to and graduate college not just for my self, but for all the Latinos who can not.”

Being Latino I try to surround myself in similar people and campus activities that reinforce my identity and remind me of home.

For example I missed hanging around Latino people at college, so I joined Student Organization of Latinos (SOL) Club that deals in learning and sharing Latino culture. I got the opportunity to work in a diverse work place as a Latino with other Latinos so I applied at the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

I then thought of a major that I enjoyed and had little diversity, so I declared my major in digital forensics. And although I am only the fourth person to go to college in my family, I am still as motivated as if I were the first person to go to college and will work hard as so.

 Conrado Ramos ‘17, digital forensics major

HuskyUnleashed SenseOfCommunity AGreatPlaceToBeYou MulticulturalAffairs