There are countless ways to enjoy summer in addition to beach vacations, music concerts and even part-time jobs. In fact, many Huskies took advantage of the gap between May graduation and August move-in to continue their Bloomsburg University experience in a variety of fashions. 

Among the wide range of co-curricular learning opportunities included working internships, conducting research and studying abroad.

Some of standout experiences included students placing among the top in the world in the Odyssey of the Mind competition in Iowa, students making record discoveries at a Hopewell archaeological dig in Ohio and several students showcasing their research - two who won awards - among more than 80 participants at the Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium at Geisinger’s Henry Hood Center for Health Research.

Among the highlights:

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Summer break has began a little differently for a group of anthropology students who put their vacation plans on hold for a memorable field school experience in Ohio. Among the highlights so far, they say, were learning the processes of an archaeological dig, discovering Hopewell artifacts and campfire conversations — along with a growing appreciation of wind and shade.

DeeAnne Wymer, professor of anthropology, and a group of students hit the road each spring in mid-May to spend four weeks in southern Ohio digging at a Hopewell habitation site. The archeological field school experience enables student teams to rely on new imaging technologies to uncover another living site of the Mound Builders from 2,000 years ago.

Life in the Dig

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Chris Vanek, a senior electronics engineering technology major, worked on sponsored research by the United States Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., on wireless power transfer (WPT) technology.  He designed and implemented a 4-MHz inductive-resonance WPT system that transferred 75 W of power wirelessly to a light bulb.
The WPT system, designed under the guidance of Biswajit Ray, professor of EET, worked up to a separation distance of 50 cm between the transmit and receive coils. The wireless power transfer technology is becoming increasingly popular for consumer electronics, electric vehicle charging, and implantable biomedical devices. 
The current engineering challenge is to design systems that maintain high power and high efficiency capability for dynamic loads with changing distance and orientation.

Chris Vanek, a senior electronics engineering technology major, worked on sponsored research by the United States Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., on wireless power transfer (WPT) technology.  He designed and implemented a 4-MHz inductive-resonance WPT system that transferred 75 W of power wirelessly to a light bulb.

The WPT system, designed under the guidance of Biswajit Ray, professor of EET, worked up to a separation distance of 50 cm between the transmit and receive coils. The wireless power transfer technology is becoming increasingly popular for consumer electronics, electric vehicle charging, and implantable biomedical devices. 

The current engineering challenge is to design systems that maintain high power and high efficiency capability for dynamic loads with changing distance and orientation.

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Bloomsburg University’s Act 101/EOP recently completed another productive and enriching summer program, helping more than 250 students — many of whom are first-generation college students — get acclimated to college life and prepared for a successful college experience. Among the courses taken and academic support provided to the students over the past six weeks included reading, algebra, college writing, public speaking, U.S. history, Spanish I, computer skills, mindfulness and college orientation.

Act 101/EOP, coordinated through the Department of Developmental Instruction, provides support and opportunities for success to students traditionally under-represented in higher education.

Through this program, students …

  • reach their potential  — Act 101/EOP assists students, who are at a financial, cultural, social or educational disadvantage, in making a successful transition to Bloomsburg University.
  •  discover the value of progress  — Act 101/EOP develops students to their fullest potential through academic advising, tutoring, mentorship and a pre-college summer program.
  • exposure to cultural enrichment activities  — avisit to the state capitol in Harrisburg and annual picnic at Town Park

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Now that summer Preview Days are over and the Summer Enrichment Program wrapping up, there’s one thing left in our way to full-blown Husky Life … move-in day.

Freshmen begin moving into residence halls on Monday, Aug. 18, and continue through Thursday, Aug. 21, with assigned times based on residence hall floor assignments and respective LLCs. 

Once settled in, Welcome Weekend kicks off and continues with a busy schedule of fun, interactive and very important events to get the Class of 2018 ready to hit the ground running for the first day of classes on Monday, Aug. 25. 

10 Helpful Website Links

  • Academic Calendar - find out when is mid-term week, holiday breaks, finals week and other important dates for each semester.
  • Campus Dining - check on the hours of campus dining locations, menus, and meal plan options.
  • Student Health Center - access to online portal to complete student health forms, outlines procedures for appointments and class absences, as well as numerous important health resources and tips.
  • Residential Computing - get information on how to register your computer, connect to the campus wireless network, access key downloads and links to get help with computer issues.
  • Shuttle Bus Schedule - game plan your travels to and from upper campus, downtown and Wal-Mart.
  • Mail Services - outlines rules and regulations for receiving mail and packages, including details on what your campus mailing address will be.
  • Student Job Listings - need a job? List is updated regularly as soon as campus work study positions open up.
  • Student Rec Center - details on hours of the center, fitness class schedules and other recreational opportunities for students, including CrossFit and personal training.
  • Student Organizations - index of more than 250 clubs and organizations for students, organized by categories such as music, religious and sport. 

And one more major link to bookmark … Registrar’s Office - your one-stop spot for scheduling classes, access to grades, changing majors, declaring a minor and anything, everything to do with your academic record and standing. 

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Mariam Sarkessian, a management major, recently completed a two-week job shadow with Comcast’s corporate headquarters in Philadelphia through Bloomsburg University’s Sophomore Experiential Learning (SEL) Program.
The program, designed to give students an opportunity to see their potential career field first-hand, enabled Sarkessian to witness the daily activity of the country’s largest cable company and Internet service provider. Sarkessian described her experience as enlightening and richly memorable.
“Seeing daily activity at the headquarters has helped me confirm that I’d like to work at a large company that has a powerful role in the world,” Sarkessian says. “I’ve gained useful insight about how to level-handedly deal with problems and make decisions with customers and the company in mind.”
In addition to a possible internship opportunity, Sarkessian says her SEL experience provided her with many more business contacts. She also may have discovered a new career track.
“Being able to help out with (the Lab Week project) even though I was just shadowing was an exciting experience and opened my mind in looking for ways to make processes more efficient,” Sarkessian says. “Most importantly, … I had not known that project managing could be a career. Now I’m eager to pursue and get the right qualifications for it.”
Sarkessian shadowed Ted Hodgins, Class of 1989, senior director of technology and product: customer service.

Mariam Sarkessian, a management major, recently completed a two-week job shadow with Comcast’s corporate headquarters in Philadelphia through Bloomsburg University’s Sophomore Experiential Learning (SEL) Program.

The program, designed to give students an opportunity to see their potential career field first-hand, enabled Sarkessian to witness the daily activity of the country’s largest cable company and Internet service provider. Sarkessian described her experience as enlightening and richly memorable.

“Seeing daily activity at the headquarters has helped me confirm that I’d like to work at a large company that has a powerful role in the world,” Sarkessian says. “I’ve gained useful insight about how to level-handedly deal with problems and make decisions with customers and the company in mind.”

In addition to a possible internship opportunity, Sarkessian says her SEL experience provided her with many more business contacts. She also may have discovered a new career track.

“Being able to help out with (the Lab Week project) even though I was just shadowing was an exciting experience and opened my mind in looking for ways to make processes more efficient,” Sarkessian says. “Most importantly, … I had not known that project managing could be a career. Now I’m eager to pursue and get the right qualifications for it.”

Sarkessian shadowed Ted Hodgins, Class of 1989, senior director of technology and product: customer service.

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To kick off the summer a group of students from Bloomsburg University’s Department of Environmental, Geographical, and Geological Sciences spent three weeks in California's Mojave Desert. The adventurous learning experience was a part of the department’s new Special Topics in Field Geology course — designed to give students an opportunity to observe a wide variety of earth processes, apply their knowledge and reinforce skills in geological observation and interpretation. 

By participating in this intense, field-based course, 13 students got a first-hand encounter with the geology and environmental issues of the western United States. Led by faculty Chris Whisner, Jennifer Whisner and Cynthia Venn, the group roughed it at rustic campsites, grilled trout caught in mountain streams, worked on field notebooks until late in the evening and endured rain, snow, hail and 116-degree heat.

At the same time, the group said it marveled at the mining impacts, stunning geology, and complex water resource issues they encountered on their 1,800-mile trek.  

Each student had opportunities to show off their knowledge through lecturing at two stops, while faculty displayed the accompanying posters. Other highlights:

  • several sites at Mono Lake, Owen’s Lake, LA Aqueduct, Hoover Dam, Ash Meadows showcased many of the ideas students studied in Water Resources Management and Ground Hydrology
  • students were assigned to sketch an unfamiliar landscape and identify as many features as they could, based on the trip. Most students were able to pick out most of the features (fault scarps and fault-block mountains, volcanoes, alluvial fans, stream-carved valleys, springs, glacial features, intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks, and sedimentary rocks) from their viewpoint across the valley.

According to Jennifer Whisner, up until that point the student didn’t really realize how much they had learned in the week or so they’d been out there!

In their final synthesis paper, nearly every student noted that actually seeing mile-high mountains, volcanoes, earthquake scars, picturesque landscapes carved by alpine glaciers and rushing water, and irrigation in one of the most water-starved parts of the U.S. helped them better understand concepts they had discussed in class, and better grasp the scale of features they had seen only in textbook diagrams.

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