From upcoming events to new opportunities for students to interesting profiles of who and what make Bloomsburg University a dynamic college environment, Husky Connections keeps you connected.

Husky Connections is a student produced show covering key and influential topics of what is impacting campus and fellow Huskies each given week.

 A look back at the 2013-14 season

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Lots of big things happening this year from the Disabilities Advisory Committee, including  hosting Iraq War veteran Bryan Anderson on Oct. 15. #BUSpeakerSeries

Lots of big things happening this year from the Disabilities Advisory Committee, including hosting Iraq War veteran Bryan Anderson on Oct. 15. #BUSpeakerSeries

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A May Day Celebration for the BU Foundation’s #HuskyPride Day display. Nicely done!

A May Day Celebration for the BU Foundation’s #HuskyPride Day display. Nicely done!

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Patients at Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital will face an easier transition into certain treatment thanks to Bloomsburg University’s Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, who recently helped the local hospital land a $2,210 grant for needed teaching aides.

The children’s hospital will use the grant to purchase MediKin dolls, overlays and toy models of equipment — items that help prepare patients and their families for medical treatment, such as dialysis and oncology. Funding will be provided through a local Robbie Page Memorial (RPM) Grant via the Sigma Sigma Foundation

As a national organization, Sigma Sigma Sigma’s motto is “Sigma Serves Children.” In 1951, the sorority established the RPM Fund for Polio research projects. When a cure for Polio was discovered, the purpose of the RPM shifted focus to play therapy. The foundation helps hundreds of children annually through the RPM Fund, which supports local and national RPM grants.

Bloomsburg’s local Delta Zeta Chapter has spent much of the past year working with Geisigner’s Child Life Services in support of several collection drives, hosting guest speakers at the sorority and planning fall activities with the child patients and families in Danville.

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According to National Center for Injury and Prevention Control, 160,000 kids miss school every day due to bullying. Bullying victims suffer the most serious consequences and are at greater risk for both mental health and behavioral problems, which is why Bloomsburg University’s McDowell Institute worked together with the Targeting Bullying Symposium.
The symposium’s full day of training was based on factors related to bullying, child development and forms of bullying such as; cyber bullying and relational aggression. Among the 100 people in attendance were the College of Education students, faculty and representatives of local school districts. Some of the speakers were Charisse Nixon, associate professor of psychology at Penn State Erie, Tina Lawson, educational consultant with the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network, and Justin Patchin, a professor at University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.
The symposium brought awareness of the prevalence of bullying and provided strategy and resources to prevent bullying. The final session was informing the student teachers about how the Pennsylvania school districts are integrating bullying prevention practices within the Positive Behavioral Support framework.
The McDowell Institute is a resource for Bloomsburg University education majors to provide enhances in training and supports to be better prepared in the classroom and to handle different issues in a better manner. Kate Nichols, the director of the McDowell Institute says the goal of the institute is to address the challenges of social and emotional needs by using preventative and proactive practices that are implemented in schools, with an emphasis on clear expectations and acknowledgment for meeting expectations for students struggling.
Fifty percent of teachers leave the field with within the first five years due to classroom and behavioral issues, says Nichols. Classroom students have more complex needs and some educators don’t have the right training to be successful in dealing with the needs. According to Nichols, three hundred schools are now implementing Positive Behavioral Support, because it makes sure all educators are prepared to deal with any situation that comes at hand. This practice is wide spread in Pennsylvania schools and 20,000 internationally. Due to this practice studies have shown, Nichols says, that there is an associated higher achievement and over all greater staff satisfaction.
— Samantha Gross, sophomore telecommunications major

According to National Center for Injury and Prevention Control, 160,000 kids miss school every day due to bullying. Bullying victims suffer the most serious consequences and are at greater risk for both mental health and behavioral problems, which is why Bloomsburg University’s McDowell Institute worked together with the Targeting Bullying Symposium.

The symposium’s full day of training was based on factors related to bullying, child development and forms of bullying such as; cyber bullying and relational aggression. Among the 100 people in attendance were the College of Education students, faculty and representatives of local school districts. Some of the speakers were Charisse Nixon, associate professor of psychology at Penn State Erie, Tina Lawson, educational consultant with the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network, and Justin Patchin, a professor at University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

The symposium brought awareness of the prevalence of bullying and provided strategy and resources to prevent bullying. The final session was informing the student teachers about how the Pennsylvania school districts are integrating bullying prevention practices within the Positive Behavioral Support framework.

The McDowell Institute is a resource for Bloomsburg University education majors to provide enhances in training and supports to be better prepared in the classroom and to handle different issues in a better manner. Kate Nichols, the director of the McDowell Institute says the goal of the institute is to address the challenges of social and emotional needs by using preventative and proactive practices that are implemented in schools, with an emphasis on clear expectations and acknowledgment for meeting expectations for students struggling.

Fifty percent of teachers leave the field with within the first five years due to classroom and behavioral issues, says Nichols. Classroom students have more complex needs and some educators don’t have the right training to be successful in dealing with the needs. According to Nichols, three hundred schools are now implementing Positive Behavioral Support, because it makes sure all educators are prepared to deal with any situation that comes at hand. This practice is wide spread in Pennsylvania schools and 20,000 internationally. Due to this practice studies have shown, Nichols says, that there is an associated higher achievement and over all greater staff satisfaction.

— Samantha Gross, sophomore telecommunications major

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