Bloomsburg University is hosting the 2014 Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) Women’s Consortium Conference on Sept. 25 to 26, featuring a wellness room, multiple workshops and Sarah Kay as the keynote speaker. Conference fees start at $90 for non-members, $75 for members and students are free.

The Women’s Consortium is designed to have women in the State System collaborate and develop leadership skills. Students, faculty and staff are invited to participate in this on-campus consortium, which will be based from three institutes — Women’s Student Leadership, Women’s Faculty Leadership and Women’s Staff Leadership.

The keynote speaker, Sarah Kay, started writing poetry when she was 14. During her young career, Kay has often competed well on stage against more experienced poets. Consortium participants will experience first-hand Kay’s talent, which she uses as an empowerment tool.

This consortium gives the opportunity for women through out the State System to connect with more than just their campus. It proceeds to provide woman with a mentorship and a network to collaborate with projects.

Denise Chaytor – Zugarek, retention specialist and apart of the Trio Student Support Service, says the motto for the conference is “One Strong Voice.” Providing information, to women of all nature, which they can use in every day life. They will feel empowered to create positive change in their school or community.

For more information contact Chaytor-Zagarek at dchaytor@bloomu.edu.

— Samantha Gross, sophomore telecommunications major

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Following another successful Meet the President event recently on campus, President David L. Soltz had the pleasure of joining the millions of people who have taken the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. The creative fundraiser, made famous on social media by the many ice-dousing videos, has been tremendously successful in raising more than $110.5 million for the ALS Association.

As Soltz said during his challenge, ALS, commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is a relentless degenerative disease that leads slowly to death. To date, there is no cure. Hopefully this will change due to the overwhelming support seen these past few months by our society, including many of Bloomsburg University’s family and friends.

Rising to the challenge to support a worthy cause is nothing new to the university community. It’s almost second nature for our students, faculty and staff.

For example one of BU’s sororities, Sigma Sigma Sigma, recently helped Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital land a $2,210 grant for needed teaching aides for its patients.

Their charitable effort is one of many examples of how BU’s Greek organizations – as well as other student groups – work with our community and support local and national charities like the Ronald McDonald House, Toys for Tots, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and our local women’s shelter and food cupboard.

Of course a prime example of BU’s passion for charity and community support is The Big Event, which annually receives a steady flow of volunteers from our entire student population. In fact, two of the largest on-campus fundraising efforts turned in record level donations this past academic year.

Relay For Life of Bloomsburg University, coordinated by the campus Chapter of Colleges Against Cancer, had more than 800 participants on 50 teamsraise more than $50,000 to benefit the American Cancer Society.

The Multicultural Center’s annual Breast Cancer 5K Walk/Run has raised more than $100,000 since the first step was taken in 2002, including more than $12,000 last fall.

These recent highlights remind BU of the biggest challenge it’s faced and the strongest relief effort it’s pulled together in recent memory. Three years ago this past week, the Flood of 2011 forever changed the landscape and, in many case, the future of the Bloomsburg community. The clear view of the Bloomsburg Fairgrounds from Route 11, where a row of houses once stood, is one permanent reminder. There are a thousand other examples in our immediate region.

BU lost seven days of classes, yet the university continued to work. Students, faculty and staff volunteered with clean up, Red Cross efforts and local emergency governmental agencies, such as call-in centers and supply aide distribution. These volunteer efforts continued well into the fall and spring. It was a clear and emotional snapshot at how much BU values its community and, in many ways, brought the community and school closer together. 

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This week offers another exciting list of events; ranging from Icona Pop tickets going on sale, bingo, a mental game show, a bus trip to Baltimore and of course free pizza at midnight.

Husky Life is full of surprises, so experience campus life like a true Husky by indulging yourself into a hypnotic sleep at the mental game show or kicking off Latino Heritage Month with some Latino bingo.

This Week Unleashed …

  • Trust Your HustleFormer NFL player and Super Bowl champion, Anthony Trucks will be visiting BU’s Multicultural Center on Monday, Sept. 29 at 6 p.m. to present “Trust Your Hustle.” Trucks, a published author and motivational youth speaker, will discuss his knowledge and understanding of the mind and body as it relates to all aspects of fitness and sports. Trucks spent time with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Washington Redskins, and the 2008 Super Bowl champion Pittsburgh Steelers before his career was cut short due to a shoulder injury.
  • Authentic Success — BU’s Multicultural Center presents, “Chasing Authentic Success,” featuring Corey Ciocchetti on Wednesday, Oct. 1, at 7 p.m. Ciocchetti, assistant professor of business ethics and legal studies at the University of Denver, speaks to tens of thousands of people each year presenting a message that will not only stick with you, it will leave you genuinely challenged. Audiences routinely refer to his messages as outright addicting. No matter the setting, venue or occasion, Ciocchetti’s message will engage your mind and motivate your heart to chase authentic success.
  • Latino Bingo — will be held on Friday, Oct. 3, at 10 p.m. in KUB Multipurpose A&B with up to $350 in cash prizes, theme door prizes and free refreshments. Only 25 cents per card, up to six cards at a time. Must be a BU student with student ID and paid Fall ‘14 C.A. free to play.
  • Mental Game Show w/ Michael C. Anthony — will be on Friday, Oct. 3, at 8 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom. Free with BU student ID and pad Fall ‘14 C.A. fee; $3 for others. Anthony’s  award winning show Hypnotized is a critically acclaimed hypnotic masterpiece that is considered the best of it’s kind in the world. You will be amazed as volunteers will fall asleep at the snap of Michael’s finger and obey the most ridiculous suggestions. Michael’s style has been described as an avante garde blend of the human psyche and eye-popping theater.
  • Midnight Pizza w/ The Folded Faces — will be held on Friday, Oct. 3, from midnight to 1:30 a.m., in the KUB Fireside Lounge and Multicultural Center. The Folded Faces, comprised of four Drexel University students, have been influenced by The Black Keys, 3Doors Down and Drive-By Truckers.
  • Icona Pop Tickets — with special guests Five Knives and Lowell Thursday, Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. in the Nelson Field House. Buy your tickets on Oct. 1 and be entered in a drawing for a meet-and-greet with Icona Pop. Tickets available for sale at the Student Activities Office, 350 Kehr Union Building. Icona Pop is a Swedish DJ duo who formed in 2009, with electro housepunk and indie pop music influences. Members Caroline Hjelt and Aino Jawo, who grew up in Stockholm, create music “which you can both laugh and cry to at the same time.”
  • Farmers Market — local vegetables, fruits and more are featured each Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Farmers Market adjacent to Navy Hall and Bakeless Center.

Husky Road Trips!

  • Football Fan Bus — sign up in the Community Activities Office! You must sign up before noon on the Thursday before the game. Buses are available for the Cheyney, Kutztown and Lock Haven games.
  • Baltimore Bus Trip — sign up in the Student Activities Office (KUB 350). Bus departs the Hospital Lot on Saturday, Oct. 4, at 7 a.m. and leaves Baltimore at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 with BU student ID and paid Fall ’14 C.A. fee; $35 with ID only and for guests.
  • Halloween in Salem/Boston — sign up in the Student Activities Office (KUB 350). Join us for this overnight bus trip from Friday, Oct. 31, to Saturday, Nov. 1. Salem, “The Witch City,” will have plenty of Halloween events. Cost, as low as $110, includes two-way coach bus transportation, one night of lodging near Boston and an optional trip into Salem. You’re responsible for securing your own roommates.

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Don’t miss the weekly Bloomsburg University Farmers Market between Navy Hall and Bakeless Center on Fridays, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Plus … get your free reusable dining containers, courtesy of BU’s Green Campus Initiative. Pick one up! When you use it on campus, you get a free cookie (while supplies last).
At the Farmers Market
Dancing Hen Farm — In addition to the leafy greens, potatoes, additional vegetables and eggs featured last week, Dancing Hen will also offer free-range chicken on Friday.
Rohrbach’s Farm Market — The fruit that Rohrbach’s is famous for will be back and some late summer sweet corn is likely to be available tomorrow.
Endless Mountains Farmstead — Cucumbers, Potatoes, Beets, Swiss Chard, Basil and Carrots will be among Endless Mountains’ offerings.
Bloomburg University Outdoor Classroom — The Classroom continues to produce perfect vegetables organically and this week heirloom tomatoes, Kale, and four varieties of sweet peppers.

Don’t miss the weekly Bloomsburg University Farmers Market between Navy Hall and Bakeless Center on Fridays, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Plus … get your free reusable dining containers, courtesy of BU’s Green Campus Initiative. Pick one up! When you use it on campus, you get a free cookie (while supplies last).

At the Farmers Market

  • Dancing Hen Farm — In addition to the leafy greens, potatoes, additional vegetables and eggs featured last week, Dancing Hen will also offer free-range chicken on Friday.
  • Rohrbach’s Farm Market — The fruit that Rohrbach’s is famous for will be back and some late summer sweet corn is likely to be available tomorrow.
  • Endless Mountains Farmstead — Cucumbers, Potatoes, Beets, Swiss Chard, Basil and Carrots will be among Endless Mountains’ offerings.
  • Bloomburg University Outdoor Classroom — The Classroom continues to produce perfect vegetables organically and this week heirloom tomatoes, Kale, and four varieties of sweet peppers.

BUSustainability SenseOfCommunity

Bloomsburg University is one of three nursing schools in the commonwealth and 100 nationwide chosen to receive a $3,000 grant from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the Arnold P. Gold Foundation (APGF) for a White Coat Ceremony.

The rite of passage was held Sunday, Sept. 7, in the Haas Center for the Arts. This year’s event marks the first coordinated effort to bring the tradition most often practiced by medical schools to nursing schools.

At the ceremony, Bloomsburg University sophomores were formally recognized onstage as they are welcomed into the nursing major before their families, friends and their junior and senior class peers. After swearing an oath, each nursing student from all three classes donned a white coat and receive a specially designed pin.

The pin serves as a reminder of the students’ commitment to keeping their oath and providing quality care to their patients.

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Throughout its history, Bloomsburg University has been proud host to a rich and diverse body of faculty. This fall, as a part of the continuing celebration of BU’s 175th anniversary, a faculty lecture series is coming to campus.

The series features six faculty members representing each of BU’s four colleges and its historical archives, eager to share their knowledge and research with the community.

To kick off the series, assistant professor of education Beth Rogowsky will give a lecture entitled “Learning Styles Have Nothing to Do With Learning.”

Rogowsky is a BU graduate, having received her bachelor’s degree in education before teaching middle school students for 14 years. She also earned a master’s degree in instructional technology from BU, a second master’s degree from Marygrove College and a doctoral degree from Wilkes University.

Three years ago, Rogowsky was asked to do post-doctoral training at Rutgers University.

“That’s where I really got the research bug,” said Rogowsky of her time at Rutgers. She studied the science of learning, observing what happened on a biological level. “The idea was to link neuroscience, which is all about the brain, with teaching, which is also all about the brain.”

One question that Rogowsky began to ask herself was whether or not teaching to an individual’s learning style improves his or her comprehension.

What are learning styles? If you are an auditory learner, you would comprehend more listening to an audiobook. A visual learner… would want to read off a PowerPoint slide.” Learning style theory has been around for decades and is commonly accepted by professionals in the education field.

Rogowsky explained, however, that there is little to no research behind this theory. “The thing about learning styles is that it makes sense… But that’s not how learning really works.”

Rogowsky did her study with 121 college graduates in order to identify their preferred learning styles and whether or not teaching in these styles improved their comprehension. She will share the results of her research at her lecture on Tuesday, Sept. 16 at 7 P.M. in Hartline 108.

The other lectures in the series are as follows:

  • Stephen Hales, professor of philosophy, will speak about “Moral Luck,” why it is puzzling, whether it is even real, and how fortune or misfortune effects one’s nature and ethical standing. His lecture is on Wednesday, Sept. 24 at 7 P.M. in Carver Hall’s Gross Auditorium.
  • Robert Dunkelberger, associate professor and BU’s archivist, will give a lecture entitled “BU: An Institutional History,” covering a number of memorable events and people that have helped to shape the university into what it is today and sharing new research about BU’s earliest years. His lecture is on Tuesday, Oct. 21 at 7 P.M. in Carver Hall’s Gross Auditorium.
  • Michael Shepard, professor of environmental, geographical and geological sciences, will speak about “Scientific History” on Tuesday, Nov. 4 at 7 P.M. in Hartline 108.
  • Barbara Wilson, associate professor of exceptionality programs, will give a lecture entitled “Pre-K Reading is More than Pictures” on Tuesday, Nov. 18 at 7 P.M. in Hartline 108.
  • Victoria Geyfman, associate professor of finance, will speak about “The Benefits of Benner-Hudock Center for Financial Analysis” on Friday, Nov. 21 at 2:30 P.M. in the Benner-Center in Sutliff. Her lecture will be by invitation only.

Nick Cellucci, junior mass communications major

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