In a recent study of the nation’s 1,500 four-year colleges, Bloomsburg University has been added to Money magazine’s release, “Best Colleges for your Money.” 
A total of 665 schools nation-wide were included. Among these ranks were 66 colleges in Pennsylvania.
Each college was ranked based on 18 factors of analysis. These elements included instructor quality, student-rated quality, affordability of college, and alumni outcomes. BU was ranked 208th on Money’s list. 
On a rating scale of five points, BU received a score of 3.12. Other colleges included on this list included Penn State-Harrisburg with a score of 2.94, Susquehanna University 2.95, and Muhlenberg College 3.04.

In a recent study of the nation’s 1,500 four-year colleges, Bloomsburg University has been added to Money magazine’s release, “Best Colleges for your Money.”

A total of 665 schools nation-wide were included. Among these ranks were 66 colleges in Pennsylvania.

Each college was ranked based on 18 factors of analysis. These elements included instructor quality, student-rated quality, affordability of college, and alumni outcomes. BU was ranked 208th on Money’s list.

On a rating scale of five points, BU received a score of 3.12. Other colleges included on this list included Penn State-Harrisburg with a score of 2.94, Susquehanna University 2.95, and Muhlenberg College 3.04.

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For Irina Shigarova, this fall semester at Bloomsburg University is unlike any that she has ever experienced. Originally from Eastern Siberia, Shigarova was selected as BU’s first Fulbright Language Teaching Assistant with the help of Russian language professor, Mykola Polyuha, who originally came to the United States as a Fulbright scholar to complete his master’s degree at Penn State University.
Shigarova, who previously worked in the Russian city of Irkutsk with a population of approximately 600,000 people, says Bloomsburg provides a much calmer atmosphere than her previous work place. Along with the overall differences in community life, she describes the challenges that she faces on a daily basis, specifically the lack of public transportation and a much different variety of food.
She is also adjusting to a different language – a different style of the English language. Shigarova taught English at Irkutsk Language Centre Bigben, and is therefore more familiar with British English, which she states, is surprisingly different from American English.
These challenges have not stopped Shigarova. Along with teaching a Russian literature course this fall and a culture course in the spring, she is involved in the Russian Culture Club, provides native experience to students through games and books, and serves as a cultural ambassador. She also is furthering her personal interests by taking a dance class.  
When asked what she hopes to bring to BU, Shigarova describes her past experiences with U.S. citizens who expressed the belief that Russians are intimidating or downright “scary.” Her main goal is to eliminate this idea, starting at BU. “The politics do not talk about real people,” Shigarova says. “We have a lot to share with each other.”
Polyuha adds, “When real people meet each other, they see real people are different from politics on TV. Having more international students, such as Irina, helps us do this.”
Shigarova’s presence at BU may also prove useful for the future of Russian study abroad. She hopes to bring a group of students back to Bloomsburg after her Fulbright experience ends. Polyuha believes having someone who knows BU firsthand will ease collaboration with Russian universities.
A similar partnership, BU’s joint-degree program with The Financial University in Moscow, Russia, has successfully provided over 165 students from Russia to graduate with a double-degree in economics at BU.
Shigarova also hopes her experience here will show her students at home “a purpose in other languages and that it can be used in real life. Places are getting more real for them when they know you’ve seen it.”
The Fulbright program is an international scholarship opportunity that strives to promote mutual understanding and instill peaceful relations among the United States and other countries by providing scholars the opportunity to experience and work at universities around the world.
In years past, the Fulbright program has provided educational opportunities to more than 325,000 individuals including professors, language assistants, and students from the U.S. and other countries. The program pays special attention to teaching languages that have been deemed important to the future of America, focusing on languages such as Arabic, Chinese, and Russian.
- Courtney Dunn, senior dual English and psychology major

For Irina Shigarova, this fall semester at Bloomsburg University is unlike any that she has ever experienced. Originally from Eastern Siberia, Shigarova was selected as BU’s first Fulbright Language Teaching Assistant with the help of Russian language professor, Mykola Polyuha, who originally came to the United States as a Fulbright scholar to complete his master’s degree at Penn State University.

Shigarova, who previously worked in the Russian city of Irkutsk with a population of approximately 600,000 people, says Bloomsburg provides a much calmer atmosphere than her previous work place. Along with the overall differences in community life, she describes the challenges that she faces on a daily basis, specifically the lack of public transportation and a much different variety of food.

She is also adjusting to a different language – a different style of the English language. Shigarova taught English at Irkutsk Language Centre Bigben, and is therefore more familiar with British English, which she states, is surprisingly different from American English.

These challenges have not stopped Shigarova. Along with teaching a Russian literature course this fall and a culture course in the spring, she is involved in the Russian Culture Club, provides native experience to students through games and books, and serves as a cultural ambassador. She also is furthering her personal interests by taking a dance class. 

When asked what she hopes to bring to BU, Shigarova describes her past experiences with U.S. citizens who expressed the belief that Russians are intimidating or downright “scary.” Her main goal is to eliminate this idea, starting at BU. “The politics do not talk about real people,” Shigarova says. “We have a lot to share with each other.”

Polyuha adds, “When real people meet each other, they see real people are different from politics on TV. Having more international students, such as Irina, helps us do this.”

Shigarova’s presence at BU may also prove useful for the future of Russian study abroad. She hopes to bring a group of students back to Bloomsburg after her Fulbright experience ends. Polyuha believes having someone who knows BU firsthand will ease collaboration with Russian universities.

A similar partnership, BU’s joint-degree program with The Financial University in Moscow, Russia, has successfully provided over 165 students from Russia to graduate with a double-degree in economics at BU.

Shigarova also hopes her experience here will show her students at home “a purpose in other languages and that it can be used in real life. Places are getting more real for them when they know you’ve seen it.”

The Fulbright program is an international scholarship opportunity that strives to promote mutual understanding and instill peaceful relations among the United States and other countries by providing scholars the opportunity to experience and work at universities around the world.

In years past, the Fulbright program has provided educational opportunities to more than 325,000 individuals including professors, language assistants, and students from the U.S. and other countries. The program pays special attention to teaching languages that have been deemed important to the future of America, focusing on languages such as Arabic, Chinese, and Russian.

- Courtney Dunn, senior dual English and psychology major

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Bloomsburg University’s campus has many beautiful outdoor areas for students to take advantage of for relaxation and activities between their classes. This year, many students will get to enjoy the outdoors while they’re in class as well.

BU’s sustainable food systems Outdoor Classroom was built this year on the hill behind Monty’s on upper campus. The classroom features raised vegetable garden beds and will eventually grow to encompass a greenhouse, composting site, perennial garden and more.

“We had wanted to add a sustainable agriculture component to the department,” said John Hintz, professor of environmental, geographical and geological sciences (EGGS). The project was funded by one of the 2013 President’s Strategic Plan Grant awards.

Several students and faculty in the EGGS department are working hard to build the outdoor classroom up and get it off the ground. In the meantime, the gardens have already welcomed a few groups.

“We hosted QUEST campers for an educational lunch and radish-picking session over the summer,” said Hintz. “An introduction to environmental science class came up and I gave them an overview of urban and sustainable agriculture… eventually we’d like to have faculty from many different departments across different colleges use it for a wide variety of things. For example, art students taking sculpture are going to create structures for taller plants like tomatoes to grow on.”

Student workers Cydnee Bence and Claire Havice, both geography and planning majors in the EGGS department, have gotten a lot of hands-on experience in their prospective field from working at the outdoor classroom.

“Right now we’re switching the beds from our summer season to our fall season, which requires a lot of planning,” said Bence. The pair have to decide which vegetables will go where and create a schedule for the care of the plants. Some of the crops are sold at the farmers market held every Friday morning on lower campus.

“We have to get a feel for how to market this to other people and emphasize that it’s all local, all organically grown,” said Havice.

Hintz says knowledge gained from the outdoor classroom will benefit students across the entire BU community. “I think students have a shockingly low awareness of what actually goes into growing food and how agriculture is evolving into a mechanized, polluting activity… The sustainable agriculture movement is countering that… to make food healthy again.”

- Nick Cellucci, junior mass communications major

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