There are countless ways to enjoy summer in addition to beach vacations, music concerts and even part-time jobs. In fact, many Huskies took advantage of the gap between May graduation and August move-in to continue their Bloomsburg University experience in a variety of fashions. 

Among the wide range of co-curricular learning opportunities included working internships, conducting research and studying abroad.

Some of standout experiences included students placing among the top in the world in the Odyssey of the Mind competition in Iowa, students making record discoveries at a Hopewell archaeological dig in Ohio and several students showcasing their research - two who won awards - among more than 80 participants at the Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium at Geisinger’s Henry Hood Center for Health Research.

Among the highlights:

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Summer break has began a little differently for a group of anthropology students who put their vacation plans on hold for a memorable field school experience in Ohio. Among the highlights so far, they say, were learning the processes of an archaeological dig, discovering Hopewell artifacts and campfire conversations — along with a growing appreciation of wind and shade.

DeeAnne Wymer, professor of anthropology, and a group of students hit the road each spring in mid-May to spend four weeks in southern Ohio digging at a Hopewell habitation site. The archeological field school experience enables student teams to rely on new imaging technologies to uncover another living site of the Mound Builders from 2,000 years ago.

Life in the Dig

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Chris Vanek, a senior electronics engineering technology major, worked on sponsored research by the United States Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., on wireless power transfer (WPT) technology.  He designed and implemented a 4-MHz inductive-resonance WPT system that transferred 75 W of power wirelessly to a light bulb.
The WPT system, designed under the guidance of Biswajit Ray, professor of EET, worked up to a separation distance of 50 cm between the transmit and receive coils. The wireless power transfer technology is becoming increasingly popular for consumer electronics, electric vehicle charging, and implantable biomedical devices. 
The current engineering challenge is to design systems that maintain high power and high efficiency capability for dynamic loads with changing distance and orientation.

Chris Vanek, a senior electronics engineering technology major, worked on sponsored research by the United States Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., on wireless power transfer (WPT) technology.  He designed and implemented a 4-MHz inductive-resonance WPT system that transferred 75 W of power wirelessly to a light bulb.

The WPT system, designed under the guidance of Biswajit Ray, professor of EET, worked up to a separation distance of 50 cm between the transmit and receive coils. The wireless power transfer technology is becoming increasingly popular for consumer electronics, electric vehicle charging, and implantable biomedical devices. 

The current engineering challenge is to design systems that maintain high power and high efficiency capability for dynamic loads with changing distance and orientation.

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